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Girl Singing in the studio.

Art Of Singing:
 Introduction

 Fundamentals

 Classification Of The Voice

 General Conservation Of The Voice

 Breathing

 Breathing Exercises

 Development Of Voice

 Interpretation And Expression

 The Halls

 Defective Voices

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The Halls

( Originally Published Early 1900's )

The halls, like the vocal apparatus itself, have their individuality, which is more or less adapted to the needs of singing. Few halls are accoustically correct, and the singer must be ready to comply with the varying demands. In other words, as the hall will not change its attitude to-ward the singer's voice, the singer's art must master the peculiarities of the hall.

I am really very sorry for those singers who, in different halls, with different conditions, are always applying one and the same method of breath control and tone production. The real secret of great art consists in balancing well the strength and carrying capacity of the tone with the qualities of the hall.

If we use insufficient, voice for the space we are singing in, the tone will not reach its destination. On the other hand, by giving out too much voice we may create an echo. Therefore the singer must endeavor to balance exactly the measure of tone and the requirements or conditions of the hall.

Of course this can be accomplished by well placed voices (forward singing). A wrongly placed voice will never be capable of adjustment to accoustics.

It is a great mistake to think that a big hall needs a big voice. Not so. Even the smallest voice can dominate a big hall, if its carrying capacity be developed to full advantage.

The orchestra's part, except during overtures, choruses, etc., is distinctly that of accompanist, and under no circumstances should singer and orchestra be competitors. It is a sad fact, nevertheless, that under some leaders such a condition does seem to arise at times. Then, indeed, must the singer be of such caliber of artistry that he is able to maintain the maximum of carrying power with yet some measure of reserve in force, or disaster is imminent.

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