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The Training of a Secretary:
 Mechanical Helps

 Filing Room And Library

 Overlapping With Other Officers

 The Private Secretary

 The Social Secretary

 The Building And Loan Association Secretary

 For Any Secretary

 Compensation

 Famous Secretaries And Their Careers

 In General

 Read More Articles About: The Training of a Secretary

Filing Room And Library

( Originally Published 1922 )

Reference has already been made to the filing room, and it will be necessary to speak briefly of filing later. It will suffice to say here that the correspondence files constitute one of the most important adjuncts of a business or any other office; and that, large or small, the filing room can be made a source of joy forever or untold annoyance, delay and expense, according partly to the plan used, but depending principally upon the care and intelligence exercised by the chief filing clerk and her assistants.

I have heard men say drily and resignedly of an important letter, " Oh, well, send it to the file, it will be safe there, forever". But there is little danger of such loss in these days of accurate filing; and it cannot occur under a good system with capable, pains-taking people operating it.

The outstanding filing systems, some one of which is likely to be in use by every large business organization in the United States, arranged alphabetically, are known as the

Acme Card System Co., Chicago, Ill.

Amberg (Amberg File and Index Co., Chicago, Ill.).

Globe-Wernicke (The Globe-Wernicke Co., Cincinnati, Ohio).

Index Visible, Inc., New Haven, Conn. Kardex Sales Co., Inc., Tonawanda, N. Y.

Library Bureau (Library Bureau, Boston, Mass. )

Rand Visible (Rand Company, Inc., North Tonawanda, N. Y.).

Shaw-Walker (Shaw-Walker Co., Muskegon, Mich. ).

Visible Postindex, The (Costmeter Company of Boston).

Yawman & Erbe (Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y.) .

It is only within recent years that corporations have considered it desirable or economical to maintain a central library, but once begun there is no company which would be willing to return to the older practice of keeping hap-hazard collections of books, periodicals, cuts, maps, ancient drawings, lithographs, models, patents, lantern slides and data of various kinds scattered over a large plant or building, uncatalogued and difficult of access. The time wasted by employees in a week seeking information on a particular subject and their probable failure to find it, might easily pay for the maintenance of a library and librarian for a year. It is a mistake to endeavor to make a company library more than a good reference library on the subject for which the business is established; but it should include every piece of available information on the activities of the plant such as finance, purchasing, selling, engineering, manufacture and shipping, all well catalogued. The librarian should be in close communication with the public and private libraries in his vicinity, and know in a general way what they contain.

There is a Special Libraries Council which publishes a list of the Libraries of Philadelphia and its environs, ,and is about to print a Directory of the Sources of Information in and about Philadelphia. The secretary of the Council is Miss Helen M. Rankin, The Free Library of Philadelphia.

If a company can secure for a librarian an employee who has been connected with it for a number of years, who understands library practice and knows the history of the company and its personnel, be it bank, insurance company, manufacturing concern or what not, it is doubly blessed, and if he should have a good memory, it is thrice blessed.

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