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Pork Shoulders

( Originally Published Early 1900's )



Picnic—A picnic shoulder comprises the lower end of the shoulder cut two and one-half ribs wide with the foot removed about one inch above the knee joint. It is trimmed full on the face and has butt removed at the joint above the shoulder joint where the blade bone begins to widen.

New York Style Shoulder—This cut consists of the full length shoulder cut two to two and one-half ribs wide and butted approximately two inches above top end of blade bone. Leg cut off just above knee joint.

New Orleans Style Shoulder—This cut consists of the shoulder cut to include the width of one and one-half ribs and only slightly trimmed on the neck end.

Skinned Shoulder—The skinned shoulder is the same as a New York style shoulder, except that the skin is removed down to within 4 inches of the shank and all surplus fat is trimmed off.

Three-Rib Shoulder—A full shoulder cut to include the width of three ribs and cut square on three sides is known as a three-rib shoulder.

Blade Shoulder—This cut is the same as a three-rib shoulder, except that it is trimmed thinner on the butt end and has the edge of the blade bone exposed. It is generally cured in dry salt.

Boston Style Butt—The Boston style butt is derived from the thick end of the shoulder and has the blade bone in. It is the part of shoulder left after making picnic shoulder. It is usually sold fresh.

Picnic Butt—The picnic butt consists of butt end of shoulder after picnic style shoulder has been removed. The cut is the same as Boston style butt and clear plate or boneless butt and regular plate combined.

Regular Plate—The regular plate comprises the fat end of the shoulder and includes the blade bone. Regular plates and boneless butts are usually made at the same time.

Clear Plate—The clear plate is the same as a regular plate, except that the blade bone is out.



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