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More Exercises

( Originally Published 1930 )

We will now apply the Indian system to a very common exercise, and one that is very tiring unless done correctly. Taken as an exercise, it is a splendid one and aids greatly in gaining control of the leg muscles.

Ascending the Stairs

EXERCISE 59.-This exercise makes walking upstairs very easy. It should be practiced very slowly at first, concentrating upon learning to balance the weight carefully and using the right muscles and movements. (Figure 36.)

Stand at the foot of the stairs ready for the climb. Assume the correct posture and inhale.

Lift the right foot, using the thigh muscles as in walking, allowing the foot and ankle to hang relaxed. Place it flat, straight forward on the next step.

Swing the weight forward and balance over the arch of the foot, midway between the heel and the ball of the foot. Using the thigh muscles to pull and the tendon Achilles to push, swing the weight forward and up, pushing at the same time with the left foot with a slight spring.

Be sure to keep the right knee flexed to permit an easy spring also. Allow the weight of your own body to propel you forward.

You will notice that there is a natural tendency to hold the breath while pushing the weight upward, also to exhale with the least relaxation.

Exhale at the finish of the step, weight still on the right foot. Repeat with the left foot.

After you have mastered the ascent, the breath control may be changed to include several steps, depending upon the speed.

Next practice taking two steps at a time; then three. This is more strenuous and requires greater dexterity in weight placement and balance. It is a good exercise for overcoming constipation.

Descending the Stairs

EXERCISE 60.-

Practice going downstairs slowly, breathing rhythmically and carrying the body with grace and poise, being careful not to descend with a jar or allow the weight to fall heavily upon the heels.

Stand at the top of the stairs ready to descend; assume the correct posture and inhale.

Swing the weight to the left foot, flex the knee and lower the weight of the body, slowly, using the thigh muscles to hold and the tendon Achilles to shove the weight forward. This will naturally cause the weight to balance forward on the ball of the foot.

At the same time swing the right foot forward, relaxed and with knee bent, place it in position, foot straight front, to receive the first pressure of weight on the ball of the foot. As the weight descends fully, the flexed ankle and knee save all jar and the pressure is finally placed directly over the arch of the foot.

Exhale as you prepare to swing the left foot forward.

As in ascending, when going more rapidly one cannot breathe with each step; the breath should then be rhythmic, Practice descending, taking two or three steps at a time; it is good exercise and tests the poise and balance.

EXERCISE 61.-This exercise is to relieve pressure in the hip socket, promote circulation, relieve nerve tension or pressure, and allow the ball to assume its proper place in the socket. Wrong posture, either standing or sitting, may push the ball slightly to one side or the other and cause knee-joint troubles or arch troubles, sciatica and other ailments. A stool will answer in place of the stairs.

(a) Stand on one step, sideways, placing the weight on the left leg and foot.

Inhale, relax the right leg, knee and foot completely, allowing them to hang perfectly limp. Hold the breath while swinging the right leg freely, back and forth. Be sure that the leg hangs from the hip joint and that the swinging motion is done freely and from the hip joint.

To do this properly, lift the leg forward with the thigh muscles, with flexed knee and relaxed foot and ankle. Allow the leg to swing back by its own weight. Pull forward and allow it to swing back again. Repeat five times. Repeat with the other leg.

(b) Now assuming position as in (a), kick hard downward, allowing the full weight of the leg, thoroughly relaxed, to fall downward. This completely relieves the usual upward pressure in the hip socket. Repeat five times. Repeat with the other leg.

(c) Assume position as in (a) and repeat (a) swinging the leg back and forth as far as you can, forcefully.

(d) Repeat swinging the leg back and forth completely relaxed, by moving the body. Brace yourself securely with the other foot.

(e) Standing on one foot, lift the other slightly with the thigh muscles. With knee flexed and foot relaxed, shake it hard, from the knee down.

(f) Repeat position as in (e) and kick from the knee joint, holding the thigh steady.

The Swing-Hang

EXERCISE 62.-This exercise is designed to relieve pressure in the shoulder joint and the spinal column as well as in the hips and knees.

A pole, tree branch or rings are the best, but a doorway casing or top of a door will answer the purpose. Any one of these must be high enough from the ground so that your feet will not touch when you hang by your hands.

(a) Inhale as you reach up to grasp the pole with your hands. Get a firm hold, then completely relax the entire body, allowing it to hang perfectly limp.

Twist from side to side, turning as far as you can.

Exhale and stand. When dropping to the floor, alight on the balls of the feet with a slight spring, with both knees, spine and hips slightly flexed.

Many swinging and bar exercises as well as trapeze stunts are excellent when the proper postures, weight placements and balances are maintained. Follow the above suggestions for the other exercises.

(b) Hang, allowing the body to swing perfectly relaxed. Inhale and hold.

Using the muscles of the arms only, pull the body up until your chin is level with the pole. "Chinning" is frequently done with stiff spine and legs ; try keeping the body relaxed and the feet relaxed and close together.

Slowly lower the body and exhale.

Repeat several times, increasing the number of times as you gain strength.

EXERCISE 63.—Music in swinging rhythm.

Hang, allowing the body to relax.

Inhale and hold.

Using the big muscles of the legs to propel yourself, swing back and forth, being careful to keep the spine flexible—never stiff.

Exhale and drop to the ground with an easy spring, knees flexed.

In gymnasium work many knee and foot swings, and a variety of rotating movements may be added, always remembering the relaxed or flexible spine.

EXERCISE 64. This exercise will stimulate the circulation of the blood. When cold it will warm one up quickly.

Stand correctly and inhale moderately.

Relax the entire body and shake yourself vigorously. Control the motion from the thighs, keeping the knees flexed slightly.

EXERCISE 65. Music, waltz or swinging rhythm.

Stand correctly but with the feet about twelve inches apart, toes straight front, knees slightly flexed.

Inhale while lifting the arms, palms in, straight ahead in front on a level with the chest. Count three.

Swing the arms forcefully back, up and around in a circle and down again in front, allowing the body to swing forward from the hip joints. Allow the weight of the relaxed arms to carry the torso as low as possible and swing the arms right on through between the legs. If the swing is rapid and the arms thoroughly relaxed, their weight will carry them well through between the legs as you bend. The swing should be rhythmic as you repeat the exercise, counting six. Be sure to relax the neck and head, allowing them to hang perfectly free at the finish of the swing, and exhale with the down-ward movement.

Now inhale slowly as you lift the arms and the torso; at the same time stretch the hands out front and swing upward, around and back to position, in a circle, counting six.

EXERCISE 66. This is good arm exercise and will stimulate the liver and gall while limbering up the shoulders at the same time.

(a) Assume the correct standing position, arms at sides, palms in.

Inhale deeply and lift both hands in front on a level with the chest, counting three.

Swing the arms straight out at the side and around to the back and, turning the hands, clasp them together, counting three. Swing to the front again, as though pulling, counting three. Return to position, exhaling slowly, counting three.

Repeat four times.

(b) Assume correct standing position, arms at sides.

Inhale and hold.

Hands above the head; swing them about a foot forward, counting three.

Swing them in an arc and clasp hands together at the back, low down, counting three. Pull to position.

Repeat four times ; exhale and relax,

Repeat, clapping the hands above and below, twisting the arms to clap the backs of the hands on the alternate move. Repeat four times rapidly.

Alternate all the movements of (a) and (b) swiftly.

EXERCISE 67.-Music in a swinging rhythm. This is an excellent arm and shoulder exercise.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides, palms front.

Inhale and lift the arms out at the sides, palms up, stretching up and out, on a level with the shoulders, counting three.

Circumscribe a backward circle, feeling the pull in the shoulder joint. Count nine. Be careful to keep the spine, knees and neck flexible.

Resume position and exhale slowly.

Repeat four times.

Repeat the exercise, making a forward circle with the arms and hands.

(b) Assume correct standing posture, hands at sides, palms in.

Inhale and lift hands and arms out at sides, on a level with the shoulders. Make the pull with the wrists leading and counting three.

Turn the hands and wrists, stretching vigorously outward, palms up.

Now, with the palms of the wrists leading, pull the forearms up until the wrists almost touch the tops of the shoulders, counting three.

Stretch the fingers toward the neck, turn the wrists again and allowing them to lead, pull hard outward, with the backs of the hands, to a horizontal position, counting three.

Again, turn the wrists, stretching outward, turn the arms and allow them to descend gracefully to position, wrists always leading. Exhale slowly as the arms descend, counting three. Repeat four times.

Vary the exercise by alternate moves. Pull the wrists and fore-arms to the shoulders three times before descending, then wave the arms up and down three times at the sides, wrists leading, in a wing-like or flying movement. This is good practice for control and produces graceful action as well as strength.

EXERCISE 68.-Music in a swinging rhythm.

Assume the correct standing, posture, arms at sides, palms in. Inhale and lift the arms out at the sides on a level with the shoulders, wrists leading.

Turn the wrists, stretching, palms up.

Swing the arms up above the head, and allow the hands to pass beyond each other in a waving motion, wrists always leading, and thence back again to the shoulder level, counting three.

Repeat three times. At the end of the third time, turn the hands, palms down, and with the wrists leading pull to position, gracefully relaxing the arms. Exhale slowly with the down-ward movement, counting three.

EXERCISE 69.-This exercise will limber the shoulder joints and strengthen the arms, flatten the shoulder blades and strengthen the muscles of the back. It is one of the best exercises for correcting rounded shoulders.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale slowly while lifting both hands in front, straight for-ward to a level with the waist line, counting three.

Stretch forward, downward and outward, and press hard with the base of the palms at the wrists. Count three.

Now swing both hands and arms outward in an arc to a level with the shoulders. Keep the elbows flexed and press hard with the wrists. Feel the outward motion of the shoulder joint and the downward flattening pressure of the shoulder blades. Count six.

Swing slowly to the front, pressing all the way back with the wrists and stretching the shoulder joint outward. Count six.

Exhale and swing to position. Repeat four times. This exercise should be repeated several times a day.

(b) Repeat the motions of exercise (a), but swing the arms up above the head, going very slowly and pressing hard all the way, and inhaling at the same time, counting nine.

Swing slowly back to position, exhaling and pressing hard.

EXERCISE 7o.-This exercise is excellent for the spine, shoulders, hips, sides and abdomen. It will stimulate the liver and the circulation.

Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides.

Inhale slowly and swing the right hand and arm back and up above the head in a circle; bend the torso forward at the hips and twist around at the same time, swinging the right arm down toward the floor. Touch the floor with the finger tips, if you can without strain. Keep the knees flexed to avoid unnecessary strain. The left hand and arm should be swung backward and up at the same time to a verticle position, reaching with the finger tips.

Swing back to position with the same movement, describing the same arc as with the downward movement, only reversed. Exhale and resume position.

Repeat three times. Repeat with the left arm.

EXERCISE 71.-This exercise will strengthen the back, legs, arms and arches and reduce the waist line while strengthening the muscles of the torso. It is one of the best exercises for balance and poise.

(a) Assume the correct standing position, arms at sides.

Inhale slowly while lifting the arms high above the head, stretching forward and out on the upward arc. Clasp the thumbs and reach, stretching the muscles of the entire torso. Rise on the toes and walk ten steps.

Lower the heels to the floor very slowly, and bring the arms to the sides, pressing outward, while slowly exhaling. Count three.

Repeat, running ten steps.

Repeat exercises three times each.

EXERCISE 72.-

Assume correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale slowly while lifting both arms out at sides and above the head, stretching and reaching out with the fingers. Count six.

Rise on the toes, counting three.

Flex the knees and slowly squat (arms still overhead), counting six.

Rise on the toes again, counting six.

Slowly lower the arms to position as you exhale and descend to heels, counting six.

Repeat four times.

EXERCISE 73.

Repeat exercises 71 and 72, but clasp the hands back of the head near the base of the neck.

Repeat with arms folded in front.

Repeat with arms folded in back.

Repeat with hands on hips.

Repeat with arms stretched out at the sides on a level with the shoulders, stretching outward with the fingers.

EXERCISE 74.—This exercise will limber the joints of the hips, legs, knees and base of the spine. It is excellent for poise and balance. Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides.

Balance the weight on the left leg and foot and inhale, counting three.

Lift the right knee as far as you can in front, and clasp it with both hands, hugging it close to your body. Count six. Rise on the toes of the left foot, counting three.

Lower the left heel to the floor again, counting three. Resume position, exhaling and counting three.

If rising on the toes is too strenuous at first, merely practice lifting the knees, hugging them and lowering them again; three times each, alternating and breathing rhythmically.

EXERCISE 75.-Music, waltz time, or one-step. This exercise is an unusually good one for developing the chest and breasts and to obtain balance and poise, with grace.

Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale while lifting both arms in front, stretching out, on a level with the chest, counting three.

Balance the weight on the left foot, counting three.

Spring forward on to the right foot and at the same time swing both arms backward, keeping them on a level with the chest. This should be done vigorously. Count three.

Swing the arms forward again and spring back to position, counting three, exhaling.

Repeat with the left foot.

Alternate, springing on to the right foot and back, then on to the left and back, counting three for each move.

This exercise may be done quite rapidly after a little practice, and with a dance rhythm. Keep the entire body perfectly flexible, especially the spine and knees.

EXERCISE 76.—Music, waltz or one-step. This exercise will lengthen and strengthen the muscles of the back and the backs of the legs.

It stretches the spinal vertebra apart, relieves pressure, and makes the body very supple.

Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Place the feet about twelve inches apart.

Inhale and lift both arms over the head, stretching and counting three.

Swing the torso forward, bending at the hip joints, and swing the hands toward the floor, exhaling and counting three. It is not important to touch the floor, especially at first. (Figure 37 B.) Some persons have long arms and short legs and can touch the floor easily, others cannot. Much damage and strain have been inflicted by performing this simple exercise in the wrong way. (Figure 38.) The real object of the exercise is to stretch the spine and the muscles of the arms and legs.

It is of the greatest importance to keep the muscles of the abdomen held firmly inward and up while bending. If you cannot bend forward far at first, do not become discouraged; the exercise will benefit you, anyway, for it will give the cushions between the vertebra a chance to expand and the blood to circulate through them while resting the nerves from pressure at the same time. Try each time to bend a little further, making two or three efforts with the one bend, but never strain hard.

It is advisable at first to allow the knees to spring slightly with the bend.

Swing up and back to position, circumscribing a wide arc, stretching all the way with the fingers, inhaling, and counting six.

This exercise is practically useless when performed as shown in Figure 38. The posture is wrong, the weight placement is wrong and the hips, legs and buttocks stiff and the spine strained while the abdomen hangs flabbily and the viscera fold and drag upon the spine.

EXERCISE 77. Music, waltz time. This exercise is designed to make the muscles of the waist strong and flexible, supple and graceful.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, hands relaxed at sides.

Bend forward as far as you can, perfectly limp, and allow the arms and hands to hang absolutely relaxed. Count three.

Rotate the body to the right, pivoting at the waist line, around in a circle, swinging easily to the front, counting six.

Lift to position, counting three.

Repeat four times. Repeat, rotating to the left, around and up. Take a full breath before each rotation and exhale slowly while rotating.

(b) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Lift the right arm above the head, inhaling. Count three. Bend the body to the left, stretching up with the right hand and down with the left, as far as you can, exhaling slowly, at the finish. Count six.

Repeat, stretching up with the left hand and down with the right, while bending to the right side.

Repeat, alternating with a free rhythmic swing, bending the elbows.

EXERCISE 78.-Any rhythmic slow music. This exercise will limber the hip joints and help to lubricate the socket and will strengthen the muscles and stimulate the circulation of the blood. It will also reduce excessive fat.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, hands on hips.

Keep the knees slightly flexed, the spine relaxed and the abdominal muscles firmly in and up; otherwise there would be considerable strain on the back and nerves. Breathe rhythmically and gently.

Rotate the hips from right to left, forward in a circular motion, feeling the ball of the hip joint rotate in its socket. Test by placing your thumbs in the joint so that you can feel the ball move about. Circumscribe a circle.

Now rotate the hips to the left, backward and around in a circle. Rotate to the right, forward and around.

Rotate to the right, backward and around.

(b) Sway the body from side to side, moving from the hip joints only.

EXERCISE 79. Any rhythmic slow music. This exercise is a good muscle lengthener and will limber the body generally.

Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides. Inhale, and at the same time

Lift both arms straight out at the sides, level with the shoulders, turn the palms front, counting three.

Twist the entire body, from the ankles to the top of the head to the right, swinging with the arms straight out. Face as far around back on the swing as you can, holding the breath.

Swing back to the front, exhaling as the hands resume the first position at the sides. Be careful to keep the abdomen in and up, and the spine flexible.

Repeat twisting in the opposite direction, to the left.

Repeat four times. Be careful to keep a correct posture.

Repeat, with the hands stretched above the head, thumbs clasped.

EXERCISE 80. Music, waltz or march time. This exercise will limber the shoulder joints, stimulate the action of the liver and the circulation of the blood.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale deeply and hold.

Swing the right arm forward, up and around back in a circle, from the shoulder joint. Keep the arm perfectly relaxed, the palm of the hand toward the body. Allow the weight of the arm to carry its own weight around for the most part. Swing vigorously five times.

Relax in position and exhale slowly.

Repeat with the left arm.

(b) Alternate, first with the right and then with the left arm, with a windmill motion.

(c) Repeat (a) swinging the arms in a circle to the back, up and around.

Repeat (b) swinging to the back, up and around.

(d) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides. Inhale deeply and hold.

Swing the right arm in front to the left and up around to the right, in a circle. Keep the fist folded loosely and the arm relaxed. Swing from the shoulder joint.

Repeat with the left arm.

Repeat swinging from right to left in a circle.

Repeat swinging both arms, first one and then the other. Alternate, with a windmill motion. Spread the feet apart, keeping the toes straight front.

Repeat the above exercises with the hands relaxed.

EXERCISE 8I.—Music, slow and swinging. This exercise will limber the spinal vertebrae, shoulders, hips, arms and legs.

Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides.

Raise both hands high above the head, stretching and inhaling, counting six.

Spread the feet about eighteen inches apart.

Swing the torso forward and allow it to relax completely, bending from the hip joints as the arms come forward and down, also relaxed. Exhale slowly with this movement.

Swing the whole body from side to side, swaying the weight from one foot to the other, slowly. Relax the neck and head completely. Count six.

Swing the arms up over the head, stretching again and inhale slowly.

Resume position, swinging arms to sides as you exhale. EXERCISE 82.-Waltz melody. This exercise is one of the most useful for everyday practice. It will develop the chest, breasts, lungs, arms, legs and torso and at the same time will greatly assist in acquiring balance and poise with grace. It is particularly beneficial for women, as it develops those muscles between the breasts and the shoulders, overcoming unsightly hollows. It also prevents the sagging of the breasts, keeps the waist slim and strengthens the back and sides. The wrists are strengthened and develop slender muscles as well as the ankles, while the abdomen, if held properly, becomes almost flat.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture.

Step forward with the right foot, balancing the weight entirely on the right leg and helping to keep the balance with the toes of the left foot poised lightly on the floor.

Inhale slowly as you raise the right arm forward and up above the head, reaching forward and out, stretching the muscles all the way. Allow the back of the hand and the wrist to lead the movement. Count six. (Figure 39 A.)

The left arm should hang gracefully relaxed at the side.

Now, rising on the ball of the foot, reach up as far as you can, stretching up and backward as far as you can while holding the breath. Count six. Be careful to keep the spine and knees flexible.

Swing the right hand down and forward gracefully, allowing the palm of the wrist to lead the movement. Reach forward and pull as you swing down, feeling the pull from the palm at the wrist joint. Count six. Exhale slowly as the arm descends. (Figure 39 B.)

Continue the pull until the hand passes the side and push back as far as you can with the palm of the hand.

Bring the hand gracefully to position.

Repeat with the left arm and hand while still balanced on the right foot, allowing the right arm to hang gracefully at the side.

Repeat swinging both arms together.

Repeat, alternating, first with the right arm, then with the left, keeping up a rhythmic motion. In this way one arm is pulling upward and the other down and back at about the same time, bringing another set of muscles into play. The breathing should be quiet and rhythmic.

(b) Assume the correct standing posture.

Repeat all the movements of (a) while balancing the weight forward on the left leg and foot.

(c) Repeat all the movements of (a) and rise on the toes. This is a splendid balancing test and uses still another set of muscles.

(d) Balance the weight on one foot, forward, and with both arms go through all the movements of (a) and (b) but instead lift them obliquely out and up and down. Count six up and six down.

EXERCISE 83.-Music, waltz or one-step. Develops the arms, sides, legs and ankles.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Relax and inhale slowly, while ---

Lifting the right arm out at the side, stretching out and away from the body, allowing the wrist to lead, counting three.

Swing the arm and hand above the head and over toward the left, stretching vigorously. Feel a pull in the entire right side of the body. Count three.

Rise on the toes, hold the breath and reach with the fingers, up toward the left, counting three.

Swing the arm quickly to position and relax, exhaling. Repeat with the left arm.

(b) Repeat, using both arms and allow them to pass above the head in the upward stretch, crossing on the way. Stretch again all the way down to position.

EXERCISE 84.-

Lift the right arm above the head and stretch, keeping the left hand on the left hip. Inhale on the upward swing, counting three.

Rise on the toes, counting three.

Bend the knees and squat. Hold the breath while descending, counting three.

Rise up on the toes, counting three and stretching up with the arm.

Back to position, exhaling slowly and counting three.

Repeat with the left arm.

Repeat with both arms. This is an excellent test for balance.

EXERCISE 85.-In this exercise you may obtain considerable variety by swinging the arms obliquely up and out or by holding them straight out at the side, sometimes with the palms front and some-times with the palms down or out. Or, twisting the arms forward and back in any of the above exercises will further lengthen and strengthen the muscles and make them supple.

Normal posture, hands at sides.

Inhale slowly while swinging the arms out at the sides, palms down, stretching with the fingers, and swing them above the head, palms out.

In this position rise on toes and squat, holding the breath. Rise, stretching upward vigorously.

Swing arms to position, exhaling slowly and lowering the heels at the same time. This is a splendid test for balance and leg strength.

EXERCISE 86.-Waltz music ; slow. This exercise is excellent for chest and shoulder development, also for the breasts, lungs, arms and legs. It helps one to maintain balance, gracefulness and poise. It will aid in correcting stooped shoulders.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale slowly and lift the arms in front on a level with the chest, wrists leading. Count three.

Turn the hands, palms in, and with the wrists still leading swing the arms back as far as you can, keeping them level with the shoulders. Stretch out and away from the body with the wrists still leading all the way and stretch until the shoulder-blades come close together. Count six. (Figure 40 A.)

Swing slowly to the front; count three and with the palms front and the wrists leading the way back, after a graceful turn of the hands in a flying movement.

Again, after the palms meet, turn the hands, palms down, and with the wrists leading, swing to position, pressing out and down vigorously. Count three.

EXERCISE 87.-Slow waltz music.

Repeat the above arm movements as in Exercise 85 and at the same time step forward and swing the weight on to the right foot with the knee deeply bent, holding the balance and weight over the right thigh. Count three. Inhale slowly while going forward. (Figure 40 B.)

Swing back as you bring the hands together in front, poised for a moment but still keeping the weight poised on the left foot, and swing the right foot back, bowing deeply with the legs but holding the body and head erect and make a similar backward swing with the arms again, counting six. (Figure 40 C.)

Exhale slowly on the backward bowing motion.

Resume the original standing position, counting three.

Repeat, balancing the weight forward on the left foot and then swing back, placing the weight way back on the left foot.

When this exercise is performed with a rhythmic swing it is graceful and very beneficial. It is especially good in class work with music.

EXERCISE 88.-This exercise will lengthen the muscles of the waist and back, making both supple and strong.

Assume the correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Inhale slowly while lifting both arms in front on a level with the chest, palms in.

Swing the entire body with the arms out, around to the right and twist as far as you can, counting six. Turn the head as far as you can at the same time. Be sure to keep the feet firmly in position and the weight correctly balanced and the spine perfectly flexible.

Swing to the front, exhaling slowly and counting three. Resume original position, counting three.

Repeat, swinging and twisting to the left side.

Repeat, swinging to the right, then way around to the extreme left and back to position. Repeat four times.

EXERCISE 89.-Waltz music.

Assume correct standing posture, arms at sides.

Rise on the balls of the feet, inhaling slowly and counting three. Raise both arms straight in front, palms in, and hold the breath.

Bend the knees and squat. low, counting three. Twist the body from the waist up, turning to the right and then to the left, counting three with each turn.

Rise, exhale slowly and swing arms to sides.

EXERCISE 90.--This exercise will strengthen the spine, neck and waist and at the same time will flatten the shoulder blades and correct round shoulders. It will also make the hip joints more flexible and strengthen the muscles of the back and the legs.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, hands on hips. Inhale a full breath and hold.

Bend forward from the hip joints as far as you can, keeping the head well up, face front. Be careful to keep the spine flexible and the muscles of the abdomen drawn in and up and the knees slightly flexed throughout the exercise. Count six.

Stretch upward and swing slowly back to position; feel the pull upward from the crown of the head as you draw the chin in toward the throat. Feel tall. Draw yourself up and feel powerful within.

(b) Repeat (a) and rise on the toes or balls of the feet while performing the exercise. This is a good test for balance.

EXERCISE 91. Music, fox trot or one-step. This exercise is good to limber the spine, neck, shoulders and arms. It is very beneficial to the supporting muscles of the internal organs and will stimulate the functional activity of the liver, gall and spleen. It is a good reducer as well.

Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides.

Now spread the feet twenty or more inches apart and get a firm stance.

Inhale as you lift both hands high above the head, stretching out in front and all the way up, counting six.

Swing the body forward and down, suddenly, allowing the torso literally to fall from the hips, exhaling as you go. Allow the head, arms, shoulders and spine to hang absolutely relaxed. The knees should be flexible and active, not stiff.

Now swing the whole torso with the arms hanging pendant, forward and back as far as you can, much as an elephant swings his trunk. Repeat four times or more.

Swing back to position, inhaling as you lift. Rest a moment and take a full breath before repeating.

Repeat, swinging from side to side, swaying from the hips.

Repeat, swinging from side to side swaying from the ankles.

EXERCISE 92 —Music, waltz time. This exercise is an excellent one for general development and poise. It is particularly beneficial to fat persons, especially those with large bunches of fat around or under the shoulders and sides. It is also strengthening to the muscles of the sides, shoulders and legs.

(a) Assume the correct standing posture, hands at sides.

Inhale slowly and deeply and place hands on thighs, thumbs back, and spread the feet about twenty-four inches apart. Count three.

Lower the body to a half squatting position, keeping the weight carefully balanced on the thighs. Count three.

Now pull the right shoulder up and forward as far as you can, stretching the muscles of the right side from the tip of the shoulder to the hip. At the same time press down with the right hand on the thigh to emphasize the pull, counting six.

Relax and exhale.

Inhale and--

Repeat with the left shoulder and side while still squatting. Exhale as you rise to position.

Repeat four times.

(b) Repeat all of the movements of (a) but, instead of pulling the shoulders up and forward, pull them up and back. This will stretch the muscles under the ribs and across the abdomen and at the same time strengthen the muscles which support the internal organs. Draw the muscles of the abdomen in and up at the same time with a strong retraction.

(c) The same movements may be gone through sitting on the edge of a low couch or stool. This is easier for most persons and a very beneficial exercise.

EXERCISE 93.--An Indian swimming stroke. This stroke is an easy, restful one to use on long distance swims and is a most perfect all-round exercise. The Indians use it frequently when they wish to swim very quietly without disturbing the water much. It develops poise and grace and may be so performed as to use nearly every muscle of the body. Once mastered, so that it becomes automatic, one can swim almost any length of time and make good headway with a minimum of fatigue—almost tirelessly.

The arm movement is made with the fingers close together and slightly bent at the knuckles or cupped on the pull.

Thrust the right hand straight ahead, palm down, and slightly turned out, cutting the water.

Swing the arm in an arc to the right, and when on a level with the shoulder, scoop it back again toward the hip, pulling hard downward; then quickly turn the hand again and pull in a powerful backward and outward sweep. It is a very full stroke and a difficult one to describe without personal illustration.

Just as the right hand reaches the hip in the downward pull, the left hand should push forward, ready for the stroke. This will necessitate a rotating motion of the body, a swaying from side to side. This acts like a corkscrew movement and weaves the body through the water with the least amount of resistance.

The leg motion may vary to suit the swimmer. It is restful to change from one stroke to another on long distance swims. I have noticed that the Indians vary in their leg stroke though most of them use a sidewise scissors kick, pulling the legs together with tremendous power.

The head may be carried in any way that suits the swimmer but probably the least resistance is met when the head rests comfortably on the water, partially submerged, making breathing easy. Be careful to keep the neck and spine flexible and always enjoy a moment of relaxation either with one arm or the other and with the legs between strokes. That moment is priceless, mentally and physically, and adds tremendously to the endurance.

This swimming stroke may be done on the back with good results.



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