Amazing articles on just about every subject...



Yogi Philosophy - First Lesson - Mantram

( Originally Published 1903 )



A mantram is a word, phrase, or verse used by the Eastern people in order to concentrate upon an idea and to let it sink deep into the mind. It is similar to the "statements," or "affirmations," used by the Mental Scientists and others of the Western world.

The mantram for the month is a verse from a Western poet, Mr. Orr:

"Lord of a thousand worlds am I, And I reign since time began;

And night and day, in cyclic sway, Shall pass while their deeds I scan. Yet time shall cease, ere I find release, For I am the Soul of Man."

Commit this verse to memory, and repeat it often, letting the mind dwell upon the idea of immortality expressed so strongly, remembering always that YOU are the "I" referred to.

SECOND LESSON—MANTRAM

"I AM MASTER OF MYSELF." Commit these words to memory, and repeat them often, letting the mind dwell upon the thoughts given in our Meditation for this month. Remember always that the "I" is the highest part of you that has been awakened into consciousness, and should be master of the animal nature from which you have emerged to a great extent.

THIRD LESSON—MANTRAM

The mantram for the month is the first verse of Cardinal Newman's hymn, "Lead, Kindly Light," which contains the deepest spiritual truth, but which is only imperfectly under-stood by the majority of the thousands who sing it. We trust that what we have said of Spirit will help you better to comprehend the hidden beauties of this grand old hymn:

"Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom Lead thou me on.

The night is dark, and I am far from home; Lead thou me on.

Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see The distant scene; one step enough for me. Lead thou me on."

FOURTH LESSON—MANTRAPS

The mantram for the month is: "I RADIATE THOUGHT WAVES OF THE KIND I DESIRE TO RECEIVE FROM OTHERS." This mantram conveys a mighty occult truth, and, if conscientiously repeated and lived up to, will enable you to make rapid progress in development and attainment. Give and you will receive—measure for measure—kind for kind—color for color. Your thought waves extend far beyond the visible aura, and affect others, and draw to you the thoughts of others corresponding in character and quality with those sent out by you. Thought is a living force—use it wisely.

FIFTH LESSON—MANTRAM AND MEDITATION

The mantram for the month is: "Thought is a Living Force—I will use it wisely and well!"

Our subject for Meditation this month is our responsibility in the matter of adding to the world's thought. When wt think that we are constantly adding to the supply of the world's thought, and also realize the enormous quantity of undeveloped thought which is being poured out from the minds of persons of a low order of development, we are led to a realization of our duty in the matter of helping to elevate and purify the volume of thought. We should guard ourselves against indulging in unworthy thoughts, and should try to radiate thoughts of help, comfort, cheer, and uplifting to our fellow-beings. Each of us can do his share of this work, and the help of each is needed. Send out thought-forms of help and love to your brothers and sisters—both in general and in particular. If you know of a struggling soul, send to it thoughts of comfort and encouragement. If you know of any in distress, send them thoughts of strength and help. Send forth your best helpful thought to the world. It may reach some fellow-being at a critical moment. When in distress yourself, there is no better way of receiving the help of strong thought of others than to send forth hopeful thoughts to others who may be likewise distressed. We can help each other in this way, and will thus open up channels of communication which will be helpful to all. Misuse not the power of thought. Let this be your rule and standard: Send no thought to another that you would not care to attract to yourself. Peace be with you.

SIXTH LESSON—MANTRAM AND MEDITATION

"Before the eyes can see, they must be incapable of tears. Before the ear can hear, it must have lost its sensitiveness. Before the voice can speak in the presence of the Masters, it must have lost the power to wound."

These words are capable of a number of meanings, each adapted to the wants of different people in various stages of development. They have their psychic meaning, their intellectual meaning, and their spiritual meaning. We take for our Meditation this month one of the many meanings. Let us take it into the Silence with us. Our eyes must be in-capable of the tears of wounded pride; unkind criticisms; unmerited abuse; unfriendly remarks; the little annoyances of everyday life; the failures and disappointments of every-day existence; before we can see clearly the great spiritual truths. Let us endeavor to rise, by degrees, above these incidents of personality, and strive to realize our individuality—the I Am—which is above the annoyances of personality, and to learn that these things cannot hurt the Beat Self, and that they will be washed from the sands of time by the ocean of eternity. Likewise our ear must lose its sensitiveness to the unpleasant incidents of the personality (above alluded to as causing tears) before it can hear the truth clearly and free from the jarring noises of the outward strife of personality. One must grow to be able to hear these things and yet smile, secure in the knowledge ,of his soul and his powers, and destiny. Before the voice can speak to those high in the order of life and spiritual intelligence, it must have long since forgotten how to wound others by unkind words, petty spite, unworthy speech. The advanced man does not hesitate to speak the truth even when it is not pleasant, if it seems right to do so, but he speaks in the tone of a loving brother, who does not criticise, but merely feels the other's pain and wishes to remove its cause. Such a one has risen above the desire to "talk back"—to "cut" another by unkind and spiteful remarks, or to "get even" by saying, in effect: "You're another." These things must be cast aside like a worn-out cloak—the advanced man needs them not. Take these thoughts with you into the Silence, and let the truth sink into your mind, that it may take root, grow, blossom and bear fruit.

SEVENTH LESSON—MANTRAM AND MEDITATION

"I Absorb from the Universal Supply of Energy, a Sufficient Supply of Prana to Invigorate my Body—to Endow it with Health, Strength, Activity, Energy and Vitality.'."

The above Mantram and the following subjects for Meditation are designed to build up the physical body, in order to render it a moo perfect instrument for the expression of life. Our previous Mantrams and Meditations have been designed for mental and spiritual development, but we realize that many are burdened by bodies manifesting inharmony and lack of perfect health, and we think it advisable to follow up this month's lesson Prana and Human Magnetism, with a Mantram and Meditation along the lines just mentioned.

Let the student place himself in a comfortable position, and after composing his mind, let him repeat the Mantram over a number of times until he experiences that peculiar rhythm and thrill which comes from such practice. Then let him concentrate upon the idea of the great supply of Pranic Energy in the Universe. The entire Universe is filled with this great Force—this great Life Principle—whereby all forms of motion, force and energy are made possible. Let him realize that he is free to draw upon it at will—that it is HIS OWN to use for the building up of the body—the Temple of the Spirit—and let him fear not to demand his own. Let him call for what is his, feeling certain that his just call will be answered. Let him breathe slowly, according to the instructions regarding the Rhythmic Breath (Science of Breath, pages 53-54) and mentally picture the inflow of Prana with each inward breath, and the expelling of worn out and impure matter with each outward breath. Let him picture himself as being filled with health, strength and vitality—full of energy and life—bright and happy.

If tired or fatigued during the day, let him stop for a moment and inhale a few deep breaths, carrying the mental picture of the inflowing Prana, and the casting out of dis-eased matter through the breath. He will find that he experiences an immediate feeling of increased strength and vitality. This Prana may be sent to any part of the body which seems to call for help and strength, and a little practice will enable the student to have such control that he can plainly feel the tingling sensation accompanying the passage of the Prana to the afflicted or tired part of the body. If one is lying down, the passing of the hands over one's body from the head downward with an occasional resting of the hands over the Solar Plexus, will be found beneficial and soothing. The hands may be easily charged with Prana by extending them loosely at full length and gently swinging them to and fro, and occasionally making a motion as if one was sprinkling water on something by throwing it of( from the finger tips. A tingling sensation will be felt in the fingers and the whole hand will be so charged with Prana that it will relieve pain in other parts of the body, and in the bodies of others, if you desire to help them. Carry the thought of Health, Strength, Activity, Energy and Vitality' into the Silence with you.

EIGHTH LESSON—MANTRAM AND MEDITATION

"I am passing through this stage of existence making the best use of Head, Heart and Hand."

Each one of us here has his own work to do. We are here for a purpose, and until we fall in with the law and work out the tasks set before us, we will have these tasks constantly and repeatedly put before us until they are accomplished. The purpose of the accomplishment of these tasks is experience and growth, and, unpleasant as our tasks may seem, they have a most direct bearing upon our future growth and life. When we fall in with the workings of the law, and see and feel what is behind it, we cease to rebel and beat our heads against the wall. In opening up ourselves to the workings of the Spirit and being willing to work out our own salvation and accomplish our world's tasks, we really take the first step toward emancipation from the unpleasant tasks. When we cease to allow our work to be unpleasant to us, we find ourselves working into better things, as the lesson has been learned. Each person has placed before him just the work in the world best suited to his growth at that particular time—his wants have been consulted, and just the right thing allotted to him. There is no chance about this—it is the inexorable workings of the great law. And the only true philosophy consists in making up one's mind to do the work set before him to the best of his ability. As long as he shirks it, he will be kept to the task—when he begins to take a pleasure in doing it right, other things open up before him. To hate and fear a thing is to tie that thing to you. When you see it in its right relation—after your spiritual eyes are opened—then you begin to be freed from it.

And in going through Life—in doing our work in the world—we must make the best possible use of the three great gifts of the Spirit—the Head; the Heart; and the Hand. The Head (representing the intellectual part of our nature) must be given the opportunity to grow—it must be furnished the food upon which it thrives—it must not be cramped and starved—it must be used, as exercise strengthens and develops it. We must develop our minds, and not be afraid of thinking thoughts. The Mind must be kept free. The Heart (representing the love nature in its best sense) must be employed and must not be starved, chained or chided. We are not speaking of the lower forms of animal passion, mis-called Love, but of that higher thing belonging to the human race, which is a promise of greater things to come in the evolution of the race. It is that which begets sympathy, compassion, tenderness and kindness. It must not be allowed to sink to maudlin sentiment, but must be used in connection with the Head. It must reach out to embrace all Life in its enfolding embrace, and to feel that sense of kinship with all living things, which marks the man or woman of spiritual development. The Hand (representing the manifestation of physical creation and work) must be trained to do the work set before it the best it knows how. It must learn to do things well, and to feel that all work is noble and not degrading. It is the symbol of physical creation, and must be respected and honored. The man or woman of spiritual development goes through the world making the best use of Head, Heart and Hand.

NINTH LESSON—MANTRAM AND MEDITATION

The Mantram for the month is "I AM."

When you say "I AM" you assert the reality of your existence—not the mere reality of the physical existence, which is but temporary and relative—but your real existence in the Spirit, which is not temporary or relative, but is eternal and absolute. You are asserting the reality of the Ego—the "I." The real "I" is not the body, but:. is the Spirit principle which is manifesting in body and mind. The real "I" is independent of the body, which is but a vehicle for its expression—it is indestructible and eternal. It cannot die nor become annihilated. It may change the form of its expression, or the vehicle of manifestation—but it is always the same ''I' —a bit of the great ocean of Spirit—a spiritual atom manifesting in your present consciousness along the lines of spiritual unfoldment. Do not think of your soul as a thing apart from you, for YOU are the soul, and all the rest is transitory and changeable. Picture yourself in your mind as an entity apart from, and independent of, the body, which is but your shell—realize that it is possible for you to leave the body, and still be YOU. During a part of the period of meditation mentally ignore the body entirely, and you will find that you will gradually awaken to a sense of the independent existence of your soul—YOURSELF—and come to a consciousness of your real nature.

The student should endeavor to give a few moments each day to silent meditation, finding as quiet a place as possible, and then lying or sitting in an easy position, relaxing every muscle of the body and calming the mind. Then when the proper conditions are observed he will experience that peculiar sensation of calmness and quiet which indicate that he is "entering the silence." Then he should dwell upon the subject given for meditation, repeating the Mantram in order to impress the meaning upon his mind. At such times he will receive more or less inspiration from his Spiritual Mind, and will feel stronger and freer all day.

The Mantram for this month, if clearly understood and impressed upon the consciousness, will give to the student an air of quiet dignity and calm manifestation of power which will have its effect upon people with whom he comes in con-tact. It will surround him with a thought aura of strength and power. It will enable him to cast off fear and to look the world of men and women calmly in the eyes, knowing that he is an eternal soul, and that naught can really harm him. A full realization of "I AM" will cause fear to fade away, for why should the Spirit fear anything?—nothing can harm it. We urge the cultivation of this state of consciousness upon our students. It will lift you above the petty worries, hates, fears, and jealousies of the lower mental states, and will cause you to be men and women "of the Spirit" in reality. You will find that the result will be felt by those with whom you come in contact. There is an undefinable aura surrounding these people of the "I AM" consciousness which causes them to be respected by the world around them.



Home | More Articles | Email: info@oldandsold.com