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The Wisdom Of THe Upanishads - The Real Self, From The Chhandogya Upanishad

( Originally Published 1939 )



It is the Self, free from evil, ageless, deathless, sorrowless, hungerless, thirstless, real of desire, real of purpose..

So they who depart without finding here the Self and these real Desires, walk not as they list in any worlds; but they who depart after finding here the Self and these real Desires, walk as they list in all worlds... .

These real Desires are covered over by Untruth; real as they are, Untruth is their covering. Man here can see no more any of his folk who depart hence. But when he goes there, into the full consciousness of his selfhood, he finds all those of his folk who are living, and those who have departed, and whatever else he wins not for seeking. For there those real Desires are that were covered over by Untruth. It is as with men who, knowing not the ground, should walk again and again over a hidden treasure and find it not; even so all creatures, coming to it day by day, find not this Brahma-world, for they are cast back by Untruth... .

Now that perfect Peace, rising up from this body, enters into the Supreme Light and issues forth in its own semblance. This is the Self, this is the deathless, the fearless; this is Brahma... .

Now the Self is the dyke holding asunder the worlds that they fall not one into another. Over this dyke pass not day and night, nor old age, nor death, nor sorrow, nor good deeds, nor bad deeds. All iIIs turn away thence; for this Brahma-world is void of ill. Therefore in sooth the blind after passing over this dyke is no more blind, the wounded no more wounded, the sick no more sick. Therefore in sooth even Night after passing over this dyke issues forth as Day; for in this Brahma-world is everlasting light.

THE INFINITE I From the Chhandogya Upanishad

"VERILY this All is Brahman. It has therein its birth, end, breath; as such one should worship it in stillness.

" Verily man is made of will. As is man's will in this world, such he becomes on going hence; so let him frame the will.

" Made of mind, bodies in breath, shaped in light, real of purpose, ethereal of soul, all-working, all-desiring, all-smelling, all-tasting, grasping this All, speaking naught, heeding naught - this is my Self within my heart, smaller than a rice-corn, or a barley-corn, or a mustard-seed, or a canary-seed, or the pulp of a canary-seed this is my Self within my heart, greater than earth, greater than sky, greater than heaven, greater than these worlds. All-working, all-desiring, all-smelling, all-tasting, grasping this All, speaking naught, heeding naught this is my Self within my heart, this is Brahma; to Him shall I win when I go hence. He with whom it is thus has indeed no doubt." Thus spake Sandilya.

PARABLES From the Chhandogya Upanishad

"IF one should smite upon the root of this great tree, beloved, it would sweat sap, and Iive. If one should smite upon its midst, it would sweat sap, and Iive. If one should smite upon its top, it would sweat sap, and Iive. Instinct with the Live Self, it stands full lush and glad.

" But if the live One Ieave one bough, it withers. If it leave another bough, it withers. If it Ieave a third bough, it withers. If it leave the whole, the whole withers. So know, beloved," said he, "the thing whence the Live One has departed does indeed die; but the Live One dies not. In this subtleness has this All its essence; it is the True; it is the Self; thou art it, Svetaketu."

"Bring from yonder a fig."

"Here it is, my lord."

"Break it."

"It is broken, my lord."

"What seest thou in it?"

"Here are but little seeds, my lord."

"Now break one of them."

"It is broken, my lord."

"What seest thou in it?"

"Naught whatsoever, my lord."

And he said to him: "Of that subtleness which thou canst not behold, beloved, is this great fig-tree made. Have faith, beloved. In this subtleness has this All its essence; it is the True; it is the Self; thou art it, Svetaketu."

"Let my lord teach me further."

"Be it so, beloved," said he.

"Lay this salt in water, and on the morrow draw nigh to me." And he did so. Then he said to him: "Bring me the salt which thou Iaidst in the water yester eve."

He felt, but found it not; it was as melted away. "Drink from this end thereof. How is it?"

"It is salty."

"Drink from the midst. How is it?"

"It is salty."

"Drink from yonder end. How is it?"

"It is salty."

"Lay it aside, and draw nigh to me." And he did so. "It is still present," said he to him; "herein forsooth

thou canst not behold Being, beloved, but herein soothly

it is. In this subtleness has this All its essence; it is the

True; it is the Self; thou art it, Svetaketu."

THE SOUL IN SLEEP, From the Brihad Upanishad

"WHAT IS the Self?"

"It is the Spirit, made of understanding among the Breaths, the inward light within the heart, that walks abroad, abiding the same, through both worlds. He meditates, as it were; He hovers about, as it were. Turned to sleep, He passes beyond this world, the shapes of death.

" This Spirit at birth enters into the body, and is blent with evils; at death He passes out, and leaves evils.

" Two seats has this Spirit, this and the seat in the world beyond; and midway is a third, the seat of dreams. Standing in this midway seat, He Iooks upon these two seats, this and the seat in the world beyond. Now as this is a step toward the seat in the world beyond, He makes this step and beholds both evils and delights.

" When He sleeps, He takes matter from this all-containing world, Himself hews it down, Himself builds it up, and sleeps in His own brightness, His own Iight. Here the Spirit has Self for light.

"Therein are no cars, no car-teams, no roads; but He creates cars, car-teams, roads. Therein are no joys, mirths, merriments; but He creates joys, mirths, merriments. Therein are no pools, lakes, streams; but He creates pools, lakes, streams. For He is the maker... .

" When in this dreaming He has wantoned and wandered, and seen good and evil, He hastens back according to His entrance and His place to the bound of waking. He is followed by naught of all that He has seen there; for to this Spirit nothing clings... .

" Even as a great fish passes along both banks, on this side and on yonder side, so this Spirit passes along both bounds, the bound of dreaming and the bound of waking.

"But as a falcon or an eagle, when it is wearied with flying about in yonder sky, folds its wings and sets itself to couch down, so this Spirit hastens toward that bound wherein He sleeps desiring no desire, beholding no dream. . . . Whatever waking terror He sees in dreams, when men seem to smite Him or to oppress Him, when an elephant seems to crush Him, or He seems to fall into a ditch, this in His ignorance He deems true. But when like a god, like a king, He thinks " I am this All, universal," this is the highest world for Him.

" This is His shape wherein He is beyond desire, free from ill, fearless. As when a man embraced by his beloved knows naught of whatsoever is without or within, so this Spirit embraced by the Self of Intelligence knows naught of what is without or within. This is His shape wherein desire is won, desire is of Self, desire is not, grief is gone. Good attaches not, evil attaches not; for then has He overpast all griefs of the heart.

" While He sees not, yet without seeing He sees; the sight of the seer is not to be broken, for it is imperishable. But there is naught beside Him, naught apart from Him, that He should see. . . . When He understands not, yet without understanding He understands; the understanding of the understander is not to be broken, for it is imperishable. But there is naught beside Him, naught apart from Him, that He should understand.

"He is the Brahma-world, 0 king." Thus did Yajnavalkya teach him. "This is the highest way for Him, this, the highest fortune for Him, this the highest world for Him, this the highest bliss for Him; of this bliss other creatures live on but a morsel."

THE INWARD RULER From the Brihad-aranyaka Upanishad

HE who, dwelling in the earth, is other than the earth, whom the earth knows not, whose body the earth is, who inwardly rules the earth, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the waters, is other than the waters, whom the waters know not, whose body the waters are, who inwardly rules the waters, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the fire, is other than the fire, whom the fire knows not, whose body the fire is, who inwardly rules the fire, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the sky, is other than the sky, whom the sky knows not, whose body the sky is, who inwardly rules the sky, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dweIIing in the wind, is other than the wind, whom the wind knows not, whose body the wind is, who inwardly rules the wind, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless.

He who, dwelling in the heavens, is other than the heavens, whom the heavens know not, whose body the heavens are, who inwardly rules the heavens, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the sun, is other than the sun, whom the sun knows not, whose body the sun is, who inwardly rules the sun, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in space, is other than space, whom space knows not, whose body space is, who inwardly rules space, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dweIIing in moon and stars, is other than moon and stars, whom moon and stars know not, whose body moon and stars are, who inwardly rules moon and stars, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the ether, is other than the ether, whom the ether knows not, whose body the ether is, who inwardly rules the ether, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the dark, is other than the dark, whom the dark knows not, whose body the dark is, who inwardly rules the dark, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the Iight, is other than the Iight, whom the light knows not, whose body the light is, who inwardly rules the light, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in aII beings, is other than all beings, whom all beings know not, whose body all beings are, who inwardly rules all beings, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless.

Thus as to nature; now as to personality. He who, dwelling in the breath, is other than the breath, whom the breath knows not, whose body the breath is, who inwardly rules the breath, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in speech, is other than speech, whom speech knows not, whose body speech is, who inwardly rules speech, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dweIIing in the eye, is other than the eye, whom the eye knows not, whose body the eye is, who inwardly rules the eye, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the ear, is other than the ear, whom the ear knows not, whose body the ear is, who inwardly rules the ear, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the mind, is other than the mind, whom the mind knows not, whose body the mind is, who inwardly rules the mind, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless.

He who, dwelling in the understanding, is other than the understanding, whom the understanding knows not, whose body the understanding is, who inwardly rules the understanding, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He who, dwelling in the seed, is other than the seed, whom the seed knows not, whose body the seed is, who inwardly rules the seed, is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. He unseen sees, unheard hears, unthought thinks, uncomprehended comprehends. There is no other than he who sees, no other who hears, no other who thinks, no other who comprehends. He is thy Self, the Inward Ruler, the deathless. All else is fraught with sorrow.

LIGHT AND DARKNESS From the Isavasya Upanishad

IN the Lord is to be veiled this universe, whatsoever stirs in the world. With renunciation thereof thou mayst enjoy; lust thou after the wealth of none.

Daemoniac are in sooth these worlds, veiled in blind darkness; into them pass after death whatsoever folk slay their own souls.

The One, unstirring, is yet swifter than the mind; the gods cannot reach it as it travels before. Standing, it out-speeds others that run; in it the Wind-spirit lays the waters.

It stirs, and stirs not; it is far, and near. It is within aII, and outside all that is.

But he who discerns all creatures in his Self, and his Self in all creatures, has no disquiet thence.

What delusion, what grief can be with him in whom all creatures have become the very self of the thinker discerning their oneness?

He has spread around, a thing bright, bodiless, taking no hurt, sinewless, pure, unsmitten by evil; a sage, wise, encompassing, self-existent, he has duly assigned purposes for all time.

Into blind darkness pass they who worship Ignorance; into still greater dark they who are content with Knowledge.

It is neither what comes by Knowledge, nor what comes by Ignorance; thus have we heard from the sages who taught us this lore.

The face of truth is covered with a golden bowl. 0 Pushan, remove it, that the keeper of truths may see.

0 Pushan, sole seer, 0 Yama, Sun, child of Praja-pati, part asunder thy rays, mass together thy radiance. I see that fairest shape of thee. Yonder, yonder spirit am I.

The breath to the everlasting wind; and be this body ended in ashes.

OM! remember, 0 my spirit, remember the work! 0 Fire, lead us by good ways to riches, thou god who knowest all courses; keep far from us crooked sin, and we will offer to thee exceeding homage and praise.

SOUL--- From the Kut'b Upanisbad

THE soul is not liable to birth nor to death; neither does it take its origin from any other or from itself; hence it is unborn, eternal without reduction and unchangeable; therefore the soul is not injured by the hurt which the body may receive. If anyone ready to kill another imagines that he can destroy his soul, and the other thinks that his soul shall suffer destruction, they both know nothing, for neither does it kill nor is it killed by another.

The soul is the smallest of the small, and greatest of the great. It resides in the heart of all living creatures. The soul, although without motion, seems to go to farthest space; and though it reside in the body at rest, yet it seems to move everywhere.

No man can acquire a knowledge of the soul without abstaining from evil acts; without having control over the senses and the mind; but man may obtain knowledge of the soul through his knowledge of God.

THE FALSE AND THE TRUE From the Chhandogya Upanishad

"THE Self, free from evil, ageless, deathless, sorrowless, hungerless, thirstless, real of desire, real of purpose, this should men inquire after, yea, should seek to know. All worlds he wins and all desires who traces out and understands the Self," said Praja-pati.

Both the gods and the demons marked this. "Come," said they, "let us seek out this Self by seeking out which one wins all worlds and all desires." So Indra of the gods and Virochana of the demons set out on a travel, and without being in compact they both came with faggots in their hands to Praja-pati, and stayed as Brahman-students for two- and-thirty years.

Then said Praja-pati to them, "What would ye, that ye have stayed?"

And they said, "The Self, free from evil, ageless, deathless, sorrowless, hungerless, thirstless, real of desire, real of purpose, this should men inquire after, yea, should seek to know. All worlds he wins and aII desires who traces out and understands this Self. This they report to be thy saying, sir; in desire thereof have we stayed."

Then Praja-pati said to them, "The Being who is seen in the eye is the Self" thus he spake "this is the deathless, the fearless; this is Brahma."

"Then who is he, sir, that is discerned in water and in a mirror?"

"It is he that is discerned in all these beings. Look upon yourselves in a basin of water," said he, "and tell me what of yourselves you do not perceive."

They Iooked in a basin of water; and Praja-pati said to them, "What see you?"

"We see in this image the whole of our selves, sir," said they, "even to our hair and nails."

Then Praja-pati said to them, "Put on goodly ornament and fine clothing, attire yourselves, and look in the basin of water."

They put on goodly ornament and fine clothing, attired themselves and looked in the basin of water. Praja-pati said to them, "What see you?"

They said, "Even as we stand here wearing goodly ornament and fine clothing, and attired, sir, so are we there wearing goodly ornament and fine clothing, and attired, sir."

"This is the Self," said he, "this is the deathless, the fearIess; this is Brahma."

The twain travelled away content of heart. Gazing after them, Praja-pati said: "They are travelling away, yet have they not found and traced out the Self. They who shall follow this doctrine, be they the gods or the demons, shall be brought low."

Now Virochana came content of heart to the demons, and declared to them this doctrine: "The Self should be gladdened here, the Self should be tended; he that gladdens the Self here and tends the Self gains both this world and that beyond." Therefore it is that here even now men say of one who is not bountiful nor believing nor given to sacrifice, "Fie, a demon!" For this is the doctrine of the demons; and when one has died men furnish his body with food and clothing and ornament, imagining that therewith they will win the world beyond.

But Indra, ere he reached the gods, foresaw this peril. "Even as this Self wears goodly ornament when this body wears goodly ornament, is finely clothed when it is finely clothed, and is attired when it is attired, so likewise this Self becomes blind when this body is blind, lame when it is lame, maimed when it is maimed; yea, it perishes with the perishing of this body. I see no pleasure herein."

He came back, faggots in hand. Praja-pati said to him, "Maghava, as thou didst depart content of heart with Virochana, what wouldst thou, that thou hast come back?" And he said. "Even as this Self, sir, wears goodly ornament when this body wears goodly ornament, is finely clothed when it is finely clothed, and is attired when it is attired, so likewise this Self becomes blind when this body is blind, Iame when it is Iame, maimed when it is maimed; yea, it perishes with the perishing of this body. I see no pleasure herein."

"Thus indeed it is, Maghava," said he; "but I wiII teach thee yet more of it. Stay another two-and-thirty years."

He stayed another two-and-thirty years. Then he said to him: "He who wanders about rejoicing in dreams, is the Self" thus he spake "this is the deathless, the fear-less; this is Brahma."

Indra departed content of heart. But ere he reached the gods, he foresaw this peril: "This Self indeed becomes not blind though the body be blind, nor lame though it be Iame, nor is it defiled by the defilement thereof; it is not stricken by the smiting thereof, nor is it lamed with the lameness thereof; but nevertheless it is as if it were stricken, as if it were hustled, as if it were feeling unpleasantness, as if it were weeping. I see no pleasure herein."

He came back, faggots in hand. Praja-pati said to him, "Maghava, as thou didst depart content of heart, what wouldst thou, that thou hast come back?"

And he said: "This Self indeed becomes not blind though the body be blind, nor lame though it be lame, nor is it defiled by the defilement thereof; it is not stricken by the smiting thereof, nor is it Iamed with the lameness thereof; but nevertheless it is as if it were stricken, as if it were hustled, as if it were feeling unpleasantness, as if it were weeping. I see no pleasure herein."

"Thus indeed it is, Maghava," said he; "but I wiII teach thee yet more of it. Stay another two-and-thirty years."

He stayed another two-and-thirty years. Then he said to him: "When one sleeps utterly and in perfect peace so that he beholds no dream, this is the SeIf," thus he spake "this is the deathless, the fearless; this is Brahma."

He departed content of heart. But before he reached the gods, he foresaw this peril: "Truly one thus knows no Ionger himself as `I am,' nor these creatures. He has sunk into destruction. I see no pleasure herein."

He came back, faggots in hand. Praja-pati said to him, "Maghava, as thou didst depart content of heart, what wouldst thou, that thou hast come back?"

And he said: "Truly, sir, one thus knows no Ionger himself as `I am,' nor these creatures. He has sunk into destruction. I see no pleasure herein."

"Thus indeed it is, Maghava," said he; "but I will teach thee yet more of it; it is nowhere but in this. Stay another five years."

He stayed another five years. These amount to one hundred and one years; so men say, "Verily Maghava stayed for one hundred and one years as Brahman-student with Praja-pati. Then he said to him: "Verily, Maghava, this body is mortal, held in the grasp of Death; but it is the seat of this deathless, bodiless self. The Embodied is held in the grasp of joy and sorrow; for what is embodied cannot be quit of joy and sorrow. But joy and sorrow touch not what is unembodied. Unembodied is the wind; unembodied are the cloud, the Iightning, the thunder. As these, rising up from yonder ether, pass into the Supreme Light and issue forth each in its own semblance, so likewise this perfect Peace, rising up from this body, passes into the Supreme light and issues forth in its own semblance. This is the Highest Spirit. . . . Now when the eye is fixed upon the ether, that is the spirit in the eye which sees; the eye is but a means to see. When one thinks that he will smell a thing, it is the Self; the nostril is but a means to smell. When one thinks that he will utter a word, it is the Self; speech is but a means to utterance. When one thinks that he will hear a thing, it is the Self; the ear is but a means to hearing. When one thinks that he will think of a thing, it is the Self; the mind is his divine eye; with this divine eye he sees these desires and rejoices therein. . . . All worlds he wins and all desires who traces out and understands the Self." Thus spake Praja-pati.

FUTURE LIFE From the Kut'h Upanisbad

NUCHIKETA said, "Some are of opinion that after man's decease existance continues, and others say it ceases. Hence a doubt has arisen respecting the nature of the soul;

I therefore wish to be instructed by thee in this matter. This is the last of the favours thou hast offered "

Yuma replied, "Even gods have doubted and disputed on this subject, which being obscure can never be thoroughly comprehended. Ask, 0 Nuchiketa! another favour instead of this. Do not thou take advantage of my promise, but give up this request."

Nuchiketa replied, "I am positively informed that gods entertained doubts on this subject, and even thou, 0 Yuma! callest it difficult of comprehension. But no instructor on this point equal to thee can be found, and no other object is so desirable as this."

Yuma said, "Do thou rather request of me to give thee sons and grandsons, each to attain the age of a hundred years; numbers of cattle, elephants, gold and horses; also extensive empire on earth where thou shalt live as many years as thou wishest.

"If thou knowest another object equally desirable with these, ask it; together with wealth and long life. Thou mayest reign, 0 Nuchiketa! over a great kingdom. I will enable thee to enjoy all wished for objects. Ask according to thy desire all objects that are difficult of acquisition in the mortal world, but do not put to me, 0 Nuchiketa, the question respecting existence after death."

Nuchiketa then replied, "The acquisitions of the enjoyments thou hast offered, 0 Yuma! is in the first place doubtful, and should they be obtained, they destroy the strength of all the senses; therefore Iet thy equipages, and thy dancing and music remain with thee.

"A mortal being, whose habitation is the low mansion of earth, and who is liable to sudden extinction, when he approaches the gods exempted from death and debility and understands from them that there is a knowledge of futurity, should not ask of them any inferior favour, and knowing the fleeting nature of music, sexual gratification and sensual pleasures, who can take delight in a long Iife on earth? Do thou instruct us in that knowledge which removes doubts respecting existence after death, and which is obscure and acquirable with difficulty. I, Nuchiketa, cannot ask any other favour but this."

DEVOTION From the Munduk-Upanisbad

Two birds God and the soul co-habitant and co-essential reside unitedly in one tree, which is the body. One of them, the soul, consumes the variously-flavoured fruits of its actions; but the other, God, with-out partaking of them, witnesses all events.

The soul, so pressed down in the body, being deluded with ignorance, grieves at its own insufficiency, but when it perceives its co-habitant, the adorable Lord of the universe, the origin of itself, and His glory, it feels relieved from grief and infatuation. A wise man knowing God as perspicuously residing in all creatures forsakes all idea of duality; being convinced that there is only one real existence, which is God. He then directs all his senses toward God alone, the origin of self-consciousness, and on Him exclusively he places his Iove, abstracting at the same time his mind from all worldly objects by constantly applying it to God. Through strict veracity, the uniform direction of mind and senses, and through notions acquired from spiritual teachers, as well as by abstinence from sexual indulgence, man should approach God, who full of splendour and perfection works in the heart.

THE ALL-HIGHEST From the Svetasvatara Upanishad

I Know hat great Spirit, sun-hued, beyond the darkness. Knowing Him, man escapeth Death; there is no other way to walk.

Than this naught else is higher, nor subtler, nor mightier; with this Spirit the universe is fiIIed.

Formless, sorrowless is the Highest; they become deathIess who know it; but others come to very grief.

With face, head, neck everywhere, dwelling in covert in every creature, pervading all, the Lord is He; thus everywhere is the presence of the Gracious.

A great lord is the Spirit, mover of the understanding, ruler of this pure approach, Light unfading.

The Spirit dwells ever as inward soul within men's hearts, conceived by the heart, the imagination, the thought; deathless they become who know this.

Showing himself in the qualities of all senses, void of all senses, He is Iord, ruler of all, refuge of all.

Handless and footless, He speeds and seizes; eyeless, He sees; earless, He hears. He knows what may be known, but there is none to know him. Men call Him the Primal, the Great Spirit.

Subtler than the subtle is He, greater than the great, the soul lodged in covert in living beings. Freed from grief, man sees by the Almighty's grace Him, the desireless, Him the Power sovereign.

I know Him, the ageless, ancient, All-soul, dwelling everywhere in universal presence, to whom Brahma-teachers deny birth, whom they call the Eternal.

The one hue that by blending of powers lends manifold hues in diverse wise from gathered substance, the Beginning and End wherein the All dissolves He is God; may He unite us with blessed understanding!

In vision of the Lord, the bounteous worshipful God, who stands sole warder over every womb, in whom this All falls together and dissolves asunder, man comes to this everlasting peace.

His form is not to be beheld; none sees Him with the eye. Deathless they become who in heart and mind know Him as heart-dwelling.

BRAHMA, From the Later Vedanta

ALWAYS I am, I give light; never am I unbeloved; thus I am proved to be Brahma, consisting in Being, Thought, and Bliss.

In me, the sky of Thought, arises the mirage of the universe; then how can I be aught but Brahma, knowing all, cause of all?

The universe, having no light of its own, could not possibly come to light but for the presence of light; I am the light, and therefore am everywhere.

I am the Witness, related to all things, most dear; I am never the Ego, for that is plunged in affections, limitations, and pains.

I am the one who knows the beings of change, and am myself changeless; were it not so, I should be altogether incapable of observing their changes.

For a changing thing goes again and again through birth and dissolution in this and that form; how can it be an observer of these changes?

There is apparent in the sky of Thought a certain mist which subsists on the lack of reflections and ends with the rise of the sun of reflection.

In this long-drawn dream of which our world is made, and which arises from the great slumber of Self-ignorance, there appear Heaven, Salvation, and the other phantoms.

This distinction between unconscious and conscious being is imaginarily imposed on me, the conscious Being, like the distinction between moving and motionless figures in a picture on a level wall.

The ocean of ambrosia, decay not because phantom bubbles arise; I, the mountain of crystal, am not flushed by the play of dream-fashioned evening clouds.

No real thing forsooth can ever be of diverse essence;thus I am without inward distinction, void of the differences arising from the world.

I am the Power self-authoritative and absolute, in which are stilled the phantom figures of the world and separate souls, of disciples and masters.

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