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Games For Everyone:
Adult Games - Part 1
Adult Games - Part 2
Adult Games - Part 3
Childrens Games
Special Games

Childrens Games - Part 3

[Part - 1]   [Part - 2]   [Part - 3]

( Originally Published Early 1900's )



LOOK OUT FOR THE BEAR!

Any number of children can play this game. One is chosen to be the "bear," and he hides in some part of the room or garden, while the rest, with their backs turned, are standing at their goal.

As soon as the children have counted 50 or 100, they all scatter and hunt for the "bear." The child who finds him first calls out, "Look out for the bear," and all the children run to their goal.

If the bear catches any while running for the goal, they become "bears." These "bears" hide together and the game continues until all the children are "bears."

HOOP RACE

All children love to roll hoops. For a little folks party, plan to have as many hoops as children, so each can have one.

Bind these around with tape or ribbon. The children contest one at a time. The child who succeeds in rolling his hoop around the room three times without having it turn over or stop, wins the prize.

If the room is very large once or twice around will be enough, so the children aren't tired out.

BUTTON FUN

An amusement for small children, is to gather together as many buttons of all shapes and sizes, plain and fancy, as can be obtained.

The largest button is the father, the next size is the mother, several children arranged according to size, and a tiny one for the baby.

Plain buttons are called servants, others animals and pets. The children arrange their families in pasteboard boxes, using pasteboard cards for chairs, carriages, etc. All children like to play "house," and a whole afternoon can be whiled away making stores out of cards, to do shopping in, and boats for the button-children to play in. "School" also can be played and the boys enjoy forming rows of soldiers and parading up and down.

STEPS

One child is chosen out. This one stands by a post or door with his back to the other players. The rest of the children stand in a row at the other end of the room or porch, as the case may be.

The one by the door counts 5, slowly or quickly, and then turns around. While he is counting and his back is turned, the others take as many steps forward as they can without being caught. If anyone is moving when the player turns around, they exchange places, and the game continues, the children advancing step by step toward the goal. When one has reached the goal and touched it, he can go back again and begin all over. The one who touches the goal the greatest number of times just by stepping, and has not been caught, wins the game.

HE CAN DO LITTLE

All the players sit in a circle. One, knowing the catch, begins by saying: "Ahem, he can do little who cannot do this." While saying this, he taps a stick on the floor several times.

This stick passes from one to the other in turn, each one thinking that the stick must be tapped a certain number of times, but the catch is that just before saying "He can do little who cannot do this," each one ought to clear his throat as the leader did at first. Allow the game to continue around the circle two or three times before explaining the catch. A forfeit is paid by each player who does not do it correctly.

WINK

All the girls sit in a circle, and the boys stand outside, one boy behind each girl's chair. One chair is left vacant, but a boy stands behind it, and by winking at the girls one at a time, tries to get one for his empty chair.

As soon as a girl is winked at, she tries to leave her seat, and take the vacant one, but if the boy behind her touches her before she leaves the seat, she cannot go. Each boy has to keep his eye on the one who is winking and on the girl in his chair, for if he is not watching, she may escape before he has time to touch her, and then it is his turn to do the winking and get a girl for his chair.

If the winking is done quickly it adds to the interest of the game. No boy can keep hold of a girl all the time; he must only touch her when she starts to leave her place, and then if she is beyond arm's length, he cannot call her back.

DOUBLE TAG

The children stand in pairs, one behind the other, in the form of a circle, all facing the center.

Two of them are out, one who runs away, and the other who tries to catch him. The one who is running away may place himself in front of any couple for safety and he cannot be tagged, but the child at the end of the trio must run, and if he is caught before he can stand in front of another couple, he is the catcher and pursues the other child.

PUSS IN THE CORNER

All the children except one stand in corners, or in any fixed stations if there are not enough corners to go around. The one who is out stands in the middle to represent "Puss." The players then beckon to each other one at a time saying, "Here, puss, puss," and run and change places with the one who is called.

Puss tries to get one of the vacant places. If she succeeds, the child who is left out is "Puss," until she manages to obtain a place.

I HAVE A BASKET

One child begins by saying: "I have a basket." The one to his left says: "What is in it?" The first one replies with the name of some article beginning with "a," as "apples:'

No. 2 says: "I have a basket," and the next one to him says: "What is in it?" No. 2 replies: "Apples and bananas," (or some other word beginning with "b").

No. 3 says: "I have a basket." No. 4 asks the same question as before and No. 3 responds with "Apples, bananas, and cats," and so on, each in turn repeating what the others have said, and adding another article, which commences with the next letter of the alphabet. Whoever forgets what the other articles were must pay a forfeit. Thus it continues until the last one has named all the articles in order, and ended with "z."

STILL POND, NO MORE MOVING

All the children form a circle, joining hands. One is blindfolded, given a cane, and stand3 in the middle of the circle.

The children march around her, going fast or slowly until she taps on the floor three times with the cane and says: "Still pond, no more moving." The children drop hands, and remain perfectly still, right where they are.

The one in the middle feels her way toward the children, holding the cane in front of her. The first child who is touched with the cane must take hold of it. The blindfolded one says, "Grunt like a pig," and the one holding the cane must grunt, disguising her voice if possible. If the blindfolded one guesses who she is, they exchange places, and the game goes on as before, but if she fails, she has another turn and may tell the player to "Bark like a dog" or "Mew like a cat" until she guesses the right one.

RING ON A STRING

Slip a ring on a long piece of string having the ends knotted together. The players stand in a circle and the string passes through their closed hands. Each makes the motions of passing something.

The ring circulates from one to another, while a player in the middle tries to find it. As soon as the ring is found, the person in whose hands it was takes his place, and the ring is passed as before.

HUNT THE SLIPPER

All the children except one sit on the floor in a circle, with their knees raised. The one left out brings a slipper, and handing it to one child says:

"Cobbler, cobbler, mend my shoe, Get it done by quarter-past two."

He walks to the other side of the room and in a minute comes back and asks if the shoe is done. In the meantime the slipper is being passed from one to the other, under their knees.

The child who is asked if the slipper is done says she thinks her neighbor has it, the neighbor is asked and receiving the same answer the one hunting it goes from one to the other until the slipper is found. IŁ it takes too long for him to find it, the slipper may be tossed across the circle, so it will be easy to follow it up.

WHAT IS MY THOUGHT LIKE?

All the children except one sit in a circle. This one thinks of something and, standing in the middle of the circle, asks each one in turn: "What is my thought like?"

Each one names some object, and when all have been asked, the leader announces what her thought was and each in turn must prove the resemblance between his answer and the thought. Whoever fails must pay a forfeit.

Suppose the thought is a stove, and No. 1 says: "Like the sun." No. 2, "Like silver," then the second time around No. 1 can say: "A stove is like the sun because they both give heat;" No. a can say: "A stove is like silver because they both shine when well polished," and so on.

ORANGES AND LEMONS

The two tallest children, one named "Orange," the other "Lemon," join hands and form an arch for the other children to pass under. The children, holding on to each other's dresses, march in single file and sing:

"'Oranges and lemons,' say the bells of St. Clement's,

`Brickbats and tiles,' say the bells of St. Giles, `You owe me five farthing,' say the bells of St. Martin's,

'When will you pay me?' say the bells oŁ old Bailey,

`When I grow rich,' say the bells of Shoreditch,

"When will that be?' say the bells of Stepney, `I do not know,' says the great bell of Bow. Here comes a candle to light you to bed,

And here comes a chopper to chop off your head."

When the last line is sung the child who is under their arms is caught and asked in a whisper if he will be an orange or lemon. He answers, and joins whichever side he chose, holding the other a=ound the waist. The game continues until all are caught, and then there is a tug-of-war between the oranges and lemons.

RED-HOT POTATO

The "potato" in this game is a knotted handkerchief. One player is chosen for the center, and the others sit around in a circle. The one in the center throws the "potato" to anyone in the circle. This one must throw it to another player and so on, tossing it from one to another, and never allowing it to rest.

The player in the center tries to catch it. If he succeeds, the one who last tossed it exchanges places with him, and the game goes on as before.

JUDGE AND JURY

Arrange the children in two rows, facing each other. The judge sits at one end in the aisle. He asks one of the jury a question (anything he happens to think of). The one who is questioned must not answer, but the child sitting opposite him must reply for him, being careful not to use any of the following words in his answer. Yes, no, black, or white. Some answer must be given, whether it be sensible, or not.

Whoever fails to answer before the judge counts 10, or answers out of turn, or uses any of the forbidden words must either pay a forfeit or become the judge.

REUBEN AND RACHEL

Blindfold one of the players. All the rest form a ring and dance around him until he points at some one. That one enters the ring and the blindman calls out: "Rachel;" she answers: "Here, Reuben," and moves about in the circle so as to escape being caught by "Reuben: "

Every time the blindman calls out "Rachel," she must reply with "Reuben" and thus it goes until finally "Rachel" is caught. "Reuben" must guess who she is, and if he guesses correctly, "Rachel" is blindfolded and the game goes on as before. If not, the same child is "Reuben" again.

FROG IN THE MIDDLE

The children form a ring. One, the frog, is chosen out, and he stands in the middle of the circle.

The children, holding hands, dance around him, saying: "Frog in the middle, jump in, jump out, take a stick and poke him out." As the last line is sung, the frog takes one child by the hands and pulls him to the center, exchanging places with him. The children continue dancing around and singing while the frogs jump thick and fast. The game continues until all have been frogs or are tired out.

HORSEMEN

This is a rough-and-tumble game for the boys, and must be played either outside, or in a large bare room.

Sides are chosen, the big boys taking the small boys on their back, carrying them "picka-back." The one carrying the boy is called the horse, and the other the rider. The sides stand opposite each other and when a signal is given, they rush toward each other, the horses trying to knock down the opposing horses, and the riders trying to dismount each other.

The game continues until a single horse and rider remain, and the side to which they belong wins the game

MY HOUSE, YOUR HOUSE

Attach a string to the end of a small stick. At the end of the string make a loop that will slip very easily. On a table make a circle with chalk.

The leader, or fisherman, arranges the loop around the circle and holds the stick in his hand. Whenever he says: "My house," each player must put his first finger inside the circle, and leave it there. When "Your house" is said, the fingers must be withdrawn.

The commands must be given very quickly, and the fisherman must be quick to jerk his rod, thus catching several fingers.

A forfeit should be paid by everyone who is caught, and the fisherman can exchange places if he wishes.

MALAGA GRAPES

All the players sit in a circle and one who knows the trick takes a small cane in his right hand; then, taking it in his left hand, he passes it to his neighbor, saying: "Malaga grapes are very good grapes; the best to be had in the market." He tells his neighbor to do the same.

Thus the cane passes from one to the other, each one telling about the grapes; but if any should pass the stick with the right hand, a forfeit must be paid. The trick must not be told until it has gone around the circle once or twice.



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