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Of The Horn-team
1. Ostrys the horn-beam, (by some called the horse-beech, from the resemblance of the leaf) in Latin (ignorantly) the Carpinus, is planted of sets ; though it may likewise be rais'd from the julas and seeds, which being mature in August, should he sown in October, and will lie a year in the bed, which must be well and carefully shaded so soon as they peep...
Of The Ash
1. Fraxinus the ash, is with us reputed male and female, the one affecting the higher grounds ; the other the plains, of a whiter wood, and rising many times to a prodigious stature ; so as in forty years from the key, an ash hath been sold for thirty pounds sterling...
Of The Chesnut
1. The next is the chesnut, [castanea] of which Pliny reckons many kinds, especially about Tarentum and Naples ; Janus Cornarius, upon that of Aetius, (verho oo:) speaks of the Lopimi, as a nobler kind, such as the Euboicae, which the Italians call maroni, quasi castaneae maris...
Of The Wallnut
1. Juglans, quasi Jovis glans, the' wall or welch-nut (though no where growing of it self, some say, in Europe) is of several sorts ; Monsieur Rencaume (of the French Academy) reckons nine ; the soft-shell and the hard, the whiter and the blacker grain...
Of The Service, And Black Cherry-tree
1. Sorbus, the service-tree (of which there are four sorts) is rais'd of the chequers, or berries, which being ripe (that is) rotten, about September (and the pulp rub'd off clean from the stones, in dry sand, and so kept till after Christmas) may be sown like beech-mast, educated in the nursery like the chesnut...
Of The Maple
1. The maple [acer minus] (of which authors (see Salmasius upon Solinus, c. 33.) reckon very many kinds) was of old held in equal estimation almost with the citron ; especially the bruscum, the French-maple and the pavonaceus, peacocks-tail maple, which is that sort so elegantly undulated, and crisped into variety of curies, as emulates the famous citria.
Of The Sycomor
1. The sycomor, or wild fig-tree, (falsly so called) is, our album, acer majus, or broad-leav'd mas, one of the maples, and is much more in reputation for its shade than it deserves ; for the honey-dew leaves, which fall early (Iike those of the ash) turn to mucilage and noxious insects, and putrifie with the first moisture of the season...
Of The Lime-tree
1. Tilia the lime-tree, or [linden] is of two kinds ; the male (which some allow to be but a finer sort of elm) or maple rather, is harder, fuller of knots, and of a redder colour ; but producing neither flower, nor seed, (so constantly and so mature with us) as does the female, whose blossom is also very odoriferous, perfuming the air, the leaf larger...
Of The Poplar, Aspen, And Abele
1. Populus. I begin this second class (according to our former distribution) with the poplar, of which there are several kinds ; white, black, &c. (which in Candy 'tis reported bears seed) besides the aspen. The white (famous heretofore for yielding its umbram hospitalem) is the most ordinary with us, to be rais'd in abudance by every set or slip...
Of The Quick-beam
1. The quick-beam [ornus, or as the pinax more peculiarly, fraxinus bubula ; others, the wild sorb] or (as some term it) the witchen, is a species of wild-ash...
Of The Hasel
1. Nux silvestris, or corylus, the hasel, is best rais'd from the ' nuts, (also by suckers and layers) which you shall sow like mast, in a pretty deep furrow to-ward the end of February, or treat them as you are instructed in the walnut ; light ground may immediately be sown and harrow'd-in very accurately...
Of The Birch
1. The birch [betula, in British bedw, doubtless a proper indigene of England, (whence some derive the name of Barkshire) though Pliny calls it a Gaulish tree] is altogether produc'd of roots or suckers, (though it sheds a kind of samera about the Spring) which being planted at four or five foot interval, in small twigs, will suddenly rise to trees...
Of The Alder
1. Alnus, the alder, (both conifera and julifera) is of all other the most faithful lover of watery and boggy places, and those most despis'd weeping parts, or water-galls of forests ; crassisque paludibus alni ; for in better and dryer ground they attract the moisture from it, and injure it.
Of The Withy, Sallow, Ozier, And Willow
1. Salix : Since Cato has attributed the third place to the salictum, preferring it even next to the very ortyard ; and (what one would wonder at) before even the olive, meadow, or corn-field it self (for salictum tertio loco, nempe post vineam, &c.) and that we find it so easily rais'd, of so great, and universal use, I have thought good to he the more particular in my discourse upon it...
Of Fences, Quick-sets, &c.
1. Our main plantation is now finish'd, and our forest adorned with a just variety : But what is yet all this labour, but loss of time, and irreparable ex-pence, unless our young, and (as yet) tender plants be sufficiently guarded with munitions from all external injuries...
Of The Mulberry
1. Morus, the mulberry: It may possibly be wonder'd by some why we should insert this tree amongst our forest inhabitants...
Of The Platanus, Lotus, Cornus, Acacia, &c.
1. Platanus, that so beautiful and precious tree, anciently sacred to ' Helena, (and with which she crown'd the Lar, and Genius of the place) was so doated on by Xerxes, that AElian and other authors tell us, he made halt, and stopp'd his prodigious army of seventeen hundred thousand soldiers, which even cover'd the sea...
Of The Fir, Pine, Pinaster, Pitch-tree, Larsh, And Subterranean Trees
1. Abies, picea, pinus, pinaster, larsh, &c. are all of them easily rais'd of the kernels and nuts, which may be gotten out of their polysperm and turbinate cones, clogs, and squams, by exposing them to the sun, or a little before the fire, or in warm-water, till they begin to gape, and are ready to deliver themselves of their numerous burthens.
Of The Cedar, Juniper, Cypress, Savine, Thuya &c.
1. But now after all the beautiful and stately trees, clad in perpetual verdure, Quid tibi odarato referam sudantia ligno ?Should I forget the cedar which grows in all extreams...
Of The Cork, Ilex, Alaternus, Celastrus, Ligustrum, Philyrea, Myrtil, Lentiscus, Olive, Granade,
Syring, jasmine and other ExoticksWe do not exclude this useful tree from those of the glandiferous and forest ; but being inclin'd to gratify the curious, I have been induc'd to say some-thing farther of such semper virentia, as may be made to sort with those of our own...
Of The Arbutus, Box, Yew, Holly, Pyracanth, Laurel, Bay, &c.
1. The arbutus, (by us call'd the strawberry-tree) too much I think neglected by us; making that a rarity, which grows so common and naturally in Ireland: It is indeed with some difficulty raised by seeds, but propagated by layers, if skilfully prun'd, grows to a goodly tree, patient of our clime, unless the weather be very severe...
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