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The Point Of View
Nature is in herself a perpetual invitation : the birds call, the trees beckon and the winds whisper to us. After the unfeeling pavements, the yielding springy turf of the fields has a sympathy with the feet and invites us to walk.
Signs Of Spring
The approach of spring is felt, rather than reasoned about. There is that in us which rises to greet the incoming tide of the year before our eyes have apprised us of any change. Winter lies over the world much as ashes are banked on coals for the night, which nevertheless retain their heat and will be found alive and glowing in the morning.
Bird Life
Walking through bare fields in the chill and birdless world some winter days, it is brought home to us what an essential feature of our surroundings the birds are, what a lack there is when they are absent ! A certain poverty lies over the earth ; the sky is no longer complete without a swift or a martin. Birds are part of the landscape ; it is they which animate it.
Songs Of The Woods
We are drawn ever by the voices of birds. Even such as might be called monotonous and unmelodious are none the less significant and welcome. The fine lisping notes of warblers, as they industriously hunt for their food, seem expressive of the contentment of their minds. All over the hemlock swamp I hear the voices of black-throated green warblers.
Wild Gardens
Improvement easily becomes an affectation, from which all healthy natures suffer periodic reactions that take them to the mountains and the forest, to those primeval estates loved of wild bees, of the phoebe and the wren.
Weeds
A strange analogy exists between plant life and some aspects of human life. The same stern necessity of the survival of the fittest physical in one, and in the other mental and spiritual seems to inhere in both. Among the weeds, competition is the dominant note, as it is in our world.
Insect Lore
Apis the bee, Vespa the wasp, and Arachne the spider these might properly figure in many a saga. Mighty are the works of the tribes of Apis, while Bombus the bumblebee befriends the pale flowers of the forest as do the winds the pine. Arachne beguiles the fly, for she is a very Medusa ; the solitary wasp slays the Gorgon and lays her in the tomb she has prepared.
Way Of The Ants
If you would see the ants to advantage to your own, that is you must turn over a pasture stone under which one of the species of small yellow ants has its nest. By thus gently removing the roof, if it is a good-sized stone, the whole colony will be in view at once. The red-ant hill presents difficulties.
Autumn Studies
Early in August we are surprised each year by the glowing leaves on the tupelo, a little patch of scarlet gleaming in the swamp, while the high blueberry is still in fruit and the silver-rod is making its appearance. By the time the wood-lilies have faded in the huckleberry pasture, the red bunchberries add their bit of color to the carpet on the edge of the swamp.
Pasture Stones
In New England pastures, the boulders are as much in harmony with their environment as any tree or shrub. They have the appearance of having grown here, quite as naturally as the bayberry and the sweet fern, and are kindred of the savin, and the low-spreading juniper which circles round them and hugs the stone like the lichen itself.
Neighbors
All wild animals are wary and suspicious, even when they do not prey upon one another. What friend has the rabbit, the chipmunk or the weasel? They lead friendless lives and die tragic deaths. Why should not a rabbit gossip with a woodchuck, for instance? One would think their common danger might draw them together, and that they might perhaps learn a little woodcraft one of the other.
Winter Woods
The first snow-storm of the season never becomes an old story. It retains its charm indefinitely, to all original minds at least, and to such as have cherished any degree of simplicity. Here is a mimic invasion of an elemental beauty which conquers us by reason of its very gentleness.
Laughing Waters
There are days when the sea is austere and unapproachable, when its mood is too lofty and severe. But the pond, fringed with alders and button-bushes, smiles in the sunshine and is friendly and inviting. It is more on the level of our everyday thought. Not always are we consoled by the vast and sublime, and we crave even more the companionable and social aspects of Nature.
The Mountains
He knew the mountains, who said, - I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills from whence cometh my help; - knew them in some intimate, spiritual way, for his words imply a noble association and companionship. Wordsworth understood them in this way, but not as the mountaineer knows them.
The Forest
Here is a forest primeval such as was never known east of the Cascade, not, at least, since that remote period when the sequoia flourished in Greenland. Man wanders, a mere pygmy, in a Brobdingnagian world of vast columnar trunks. This is the true home of the great conifers, the sequoia, silver fir, sugar-pine and Douglas spruce, the magnificent of the earth.
The Sea
The sea ever baffles description. It is a living thing, pulsating with energy, and, possessed of a subtle consciousness, elusive and full of moods changeable as woman and as incomprehensible. Now it is tender and appealing ; again distant and cold. Perhaps it is because of its essentially feminine traits that it so beguiles.
Athens, The Violet-crowned
THE incomparable glory of Athens lies not only in her stupendous monumental art, as seen in the Parthenon, the temples of Olympian Zeus, of the Nike, the Horologium of Andronikus, the Erechtheum, the theater of Dionysius, and other mighty ruins of a great and historic past, but even more in her rich heritage of immortal power.
Athens - Saunterings And Surprises
Athens is a place to tempt the saunterer. It is not only that the very air thrills with heroic and consecrated associations; that the splendor and purity of coloring on hillside and plain and sea enchant the eye; that the grandeur of violet-crowned mountains and the spell of classic association lend their glory to enthrall the spirit.
Athens - The Acropolis
IT is no marvel that the poets, from Pindar and Aristophanes to those of the present time, unite in celebrating the Acropolis. Its unsurpassed beauty of situation, overlooking the entire Attic plain; the splendor and brilliancy of its temples; its rich and elaborate sculptures; its significance as the center of Athenian life, combine to make its appeal to the imagination an irresistible one.
Eleusinian Mysteries
THE Mysteries at Eleusis have been the mystery of the ages, and of all the numerous and varied solutions offered by antiquarian, philosopher, or commentator, no one theory has ever obtained complete and universal acceptance. What were these rites themselves? What was their purpose?
The Story Of Dr. Schliemann
These words hold in epitome the entire biography of Dr. Heinrich Schliemann, whose contribution to classical science in his discovery of the ancient Greek civilization has conferred the most splendid and notable service on contemporary life.
Archaeological Schools In Athens
ARCHAEOLOGY in Athens is almost as much of an immediate and universal interest as politics in Washington; and besides the Archaeological Society of the Athenians themselves, which is constantly rendering important services to the world of scholarship at large, Great Britain, America, France, and Germany maintain each a national school in the Hellenic capital for the promotion of classical studies.
Greek Sculpture And Philosophy
SCULPTURE and philosophy would hardly be considered together in any usual study of the various forms of expression in national life; but, with the ancient Greeks, the relation between their art and philosophy must be clearly recognized.
Contemporary Literature In Greece
A NATION'S literature is, by virtue of some spiritual alchemy, the most potent and penetrating among the controlling influences of any period of history; and its quality is an unerring touchstone of the life of the day. It is the glory of Greece that she is not alone living on her splendid and unrivaled past.
Ethical Poetry Of Greece
MR. GLADSTONE somewhere speaks of the great business of understanding a poet; and there is perhaps no way so direct to the under-standing of a people as to study their poets. The goddess Athena is said to have pacified the Furies by promising them a local sanctuary on the Acropolis and the reverential consideration of all the citizens.
Charm Of Corfu
A SEA of brilliant, luminous blue; an atmosphere whose perfect transparency suggests some interior of pearl and alabaster; the very faintest hint of golden light in the crystal air, and cliffs of richest violet, rose-shadowed, rising against the sky.
Royal Family Of Greece
THE general social life in Athens is not one of elaborate ceremonial, although the usual customs of European society prevail. The life of representation, so to speak, that of the royal and diplomatic circles, is one of refinement and unostentatious elegance. The royal family live in simplicity and are accessible to all proper credentials.
Progress Of Greece
ALL Hellenists agree that Greek nationality extends in an unbroken line from the pre-historic to the present age. While the earlier periods left no direct political inheritance, the genius of the race, in its intellectual and moral distinction, perpetuated its characteristics.
First Century Of Greek Independence
NOT until 1935, still nearly a quarter of a century in the future, will Greece celebrate her first centenary of independence; for while with the fall of Missolonghi in 1826 she became free, it was not until nine years later that the new government, with King Otho on the throne, was established.
Origin Of Music
DARWIN'S theory that music had its -origin in the sounds made by the half-human progenitors of man during the season of courtship seems for many reasons to be inadequate and untenable. A much more plausible explanation, it seems to me, is to be found in the theory of Theophrastus, in which the origin of music is attributed to the whole range of human emotion.
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