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Triumphant Death of a Japanese Student
Japan, seeing the advantage of the Western, over the Oriental civilization, years ago began sending some of her most brilliant young men to various universities in Europe and America, to learn the literature, laws, industries and customs of foreign nations, and to bring that knowledge back as practical information to their native land.
A Turtle Four Hundred Years Old
In the marine turtle tank, in the reptile house at the Zoological Park of New York, there is a huge turtle whose head is over eight inches in diameter, and whose weight is a hundred and five pounds. It was captured by J. B. Freeland in a swamp near Plaquemine, La. The most singular thing about this creature is its age.
Moody and His Brother George
Preaching upon the text, Wherefore he is not ashamed to call them brethren, Dr. Pentecost, dwelling upon the advantages of having a King Brother at the right hand of God, in the great Day of Judgment, related the following incident.
A Motionless Nation
In many parts of the United States on the day of President McKinley's funeral, aside from the cessation from labor, in obedience to the proclamation of President Roosevelt, there were the few moments of as near silence and inactivity as is possible to mortals.
Boxed the Train-Boy's Ears
There was a train-boy, fourteen years old, on the Grand Trunk Railroad, who had unusual enterprise. He had the regulation stock of peanuts, candies, fruits and papers. The morning after the battle of Pittsburg Landing he persuaded the manager of the Detroit Free Press to let him have a thousand copies of the paper on credit.
The Influence of Burns Over Whittier
A scotch tramp visited the house of the father of John Greenleaf Whittier in the country, when the latter was a boy. The tramp having been fed in the kitchen, sang some songs of Burns—Highland Mary, Bonnie Doone and Auld Lang Syne. The boy was wild with delight; this appreciation was evidence that he possessed poetic instinct, for Britain, since the days of Elizabeth had heard few such songs as those of Burns.
It Was His Own Boy
Christ's human kinship is so deep and so wide that whoever be the parent the child is our brother; and every effort to rescue him will be appreciated and rewarded by our Elder Brother. Men and women are constantly risking their own lives to rescue the multitudes who have fallen into the stream of barbarism and heathenism.
The Dangerous Cigarette
Edward Weinschrieder brought action in the Supreme Court in Brooklyn for $10,000 damage against a firm of tobacco merchants. He was smoking a Jumbo cigarette, which, being charged with high explosives, went off, tearing three fingers from his left hand; and the suit against the manufacturers was to secure damages from them.
The Heroism of a Dog
Dr. John Manning was bathing in the ocean at Asbury Park, when an undertow bore him out to sea. Exhausted with his vain struggles to make his way to the shore, and feeling that he would certainly perish unless relief immediately reached him, he gave loud cries for help. A St. Bernard dog, belonging to Mr. W. H. Smith, of Brooklyn, hearing his cries, and seeing his distressed condition, plunged into the water and swam out to him.
A Trying Ordeal
A surgeon, assisted by his son, who was also a surgeon, was stricken with heart disease while performing an operation. The son had to instantly choose between duty to the unconscious form on the table or to the unconscious form on the floor. He did not hesitate. Picking up the fallen scalpel he completed the operation, and when the patient was safe his father was dead.
The Young Missionary To Indiana
Poverty and the wilderness, where there is the right spirit, are not barriers, but helps to success. They encourage a self-dependence, strength of will and manly vigor which are necessary to the highest mastery in life. They have developed some of the greatest men in every calling which the world has ever known. Unfaltering faith in the Gospel of Jesus Christ and its acceptance as a vitalizing force in the soul is the secret of true success in life.
It Was All My Fault - I Forgot
There was a collision on the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad, eight miles north of Cadillac, between a regular freight train and an extra passenger train, in which several were killed and injured. The wreck was caused by the engineer, Frederick Zimmerman, of the freight train, for-getting an order which was given him verbally to sidetrack his train several miles south of the scene of the incident and await the passage of the passenger train.
A Naval Commander's Heroism
Commander Craven came of a famous fighting race, and by his many acts of gallantry, combined with a highly chivalrous character, had earned through the service, the sobriquet of the Sidney of the American Navy. By his heroic death, he emphatically proved his right to the title by which he will for all time be known.
The Friend Who Made Lincoln President
From a group of the intimate friends of Mr. Lincoln, I learned many of the circumstances that led to his nomination for the Presidency the first time, and the important part Judge Davis had in bringing it about.
Children Perishing With the Famine in India
The cry of a child can be heard a long distance. The cry of the fatherless and motherless children of India has been heard around the world, arid has awakened the people of our land somewhat, to a sense of their privilege and duty, so that, by the unspeakable eloquence of lips mute in death, our Heavenly Father has taught us the lesson of universal need and inspired benevolences, which will not only care for the bodies, but also feed with the Bread of Life, the famishing souls of the little ones for whom Christ died.
Why The Lotus Blooms on the Nile
Along the streams of time there are flowers blooming which have grown from seeds scattered by the fingers of the darling little ones who have gone away from us to heaven. From the singular beauty of the flowers, and the delicious fragrance which they breathe, we know that the seeds from which they have sprung belong to another world.
Doing the Will of God
God can use us for his glory when we have wholly yielded to his will, and only then. We are not, like pens, destitute of life and of free-agency; but we can use our free wills to choose to do the will of God, and so become as it were mere instruments, though highly organized instruments, to do whatever he desires to have done.
Skarsfos and Lotefos
Direction—We are facing east. Surroundings—Other craggy hills are behind us and at our right. The little river is bending around to flow nearly north toward Odde at the head of the fjord.
Village roofs and sunny fields of Oddenorth
We are facing now toward several of the most beautiful of the western fjords. For more than two hundred miles straight ahead the coast line is so cut up by long, irregular inlets that it would measure probably three times the straight distance.
The village church at Odde
There are several interesting excursions from Odde. Some of them involve journeying in a little fjord steamer which touches at various small piers like an accommodation train.
Leaving Odde for an excursion
One of the most interesting local excursions made from Odde is to a certain valley high up on the mountains at the east (right) of the fjord. It takes a whole day to go up there and return.
The imposing Skjaeggedalsfos leaps 525 feet
I had seen hundreds of large and thousands of small falls in Norway ; many were much higher, but none had ever impressed me with their beauty like the Ringedal. I gazed at it for hours, and new combinations and wonderful forms continually presented themselves.
The road to Voringfos creeps past Lake Oifjord's
We are looking north, i. e., down the lake towards its outlet into the fjord. Surroundings —For some distance behind us the lake lies just below the road, like this.
The seething waters of the mighty Voringfos
It is afternoon light which shines down into the gorge from up be-hind us. Surroundings—All around us are tall cliffs, some bare, some mossy. It is just a deep cleft in the rocks into which the river hurls itself.
Snowy heights of Hardanger glacier
We are facing north. Surroundings—This is the northern slope of Mt. Berakup on which we stand. All around us are dreary, uninhabited wastes of moor. At our right the moor stretches off sixty or seventy miles toward the interior of Norway.
Where Rembesdalsfos comes over a towering precipice
We are facing north toward part of the great glacier which we saw in the distance when we were with the reindeer over on Hardanger Vidda. Surroundings—Around us on all sides are crags and ledges like what we see.
Hardanger glacier
That is Lars again. The boat used to belong to the saeter before it was abandoned, and he has bailed it out to serve for a row across to the glacier. The greenish water is full of fine, powdery waste from the rocks over which the heavy ice-mass has been scraping and grinding, as it slowly settles toward this melting-point.
Bergen, west from the Floifjeld
We are facing west, so the open ocean must lie beyond those islands which wall-in the horizon. Surroundings—We are only part way up the Floifjeld; it rises steep and rugged behind us.
In the great market place of busy Bergen
We are facing north towards the steep wall of the Floifjeld, from which we had just been looking off. Surroundings—The harbor is just at our left. The peninsula district of the town, over which we have been looking, lies off over our left shoulder, i.e., partially behind us. Directly behind us and at the right are the newer sections of the town.
The greatest fish market of Norway
Towards open ocean, though large islands cut off the view in the distance. Surroundings —The flower-sellers are now at our left. The towering bulk of the Floifjeld is now beyond a few crowded streets at our right.
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