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Wines Spain, Wines Portugal, Wines Madeira
SPAIN is one of the principal wine-producing countries of Europe, but though a great many sorts of Spanish wine are made and exported she has always been more closely identified in this country with Sherry than with any other variety.
Wines Of Italy And Sicily, Austria, And Hungary
ITALY, on account of her geographical. position, has great natural advantages as a wine-producing country, and as regards quantity she ranks very high among European nations. The soil is good and, under the eyes of an almost tropical sun, the grapes ripen to perfection.
Wines Of Australia And California
THE climate of Australia can hardly be said to be in all respects suited to the successful production of wine. Droughts are frequent, as are also heavy rains, and such conditions, alternating, are not favourable to the vine.
The Celler Treatment Of Wines
What would the world be without wine? And should we not, in return for all it so fully and freely gives us, at least try to do our part in seeing that we get it good and pure, and in showing by our care and treatment of it that we are not unworthy of so priceless a gift?
Brandy
For medicinal use fine old Brandy, on account of the large pro-portion of vinous ethers it contains, is absolutely invaluable and quite without a rival; and as an everyday beverage for those to whom wine is debarred there can be no better or more wholesome stimulant.
Writing - Beginning And Ending
Many are the stories upon whose merit a searching ray of illumination can be thrown by the manner in which they are begun, just as we may judge people by the way in which they respond to an introduction.
Writing - Dialogue
Good dialogue must be convincing in quality, must portray exactly and suggestively the character from whom the speech comes. The reader will be as quick to observe falsity of speech as he is in natural life when a person with little or no education attempts to use words of whose exact meaning he is in doubt.
Writing - Setting
Setting in a story is the time, place, and conditions under which the action of the story occurs. Setting bears the same relation to the story that the sound drum bears to the Phonograph. In both cases, the lack of the developing feature of setting and sound drum will detract greatly from the final impression of the story and the music.
Writing - Style
Style in writing is just as true a portrayal of what a man is—how his texture of thought is woven together—as are the actions of his life. Style is a particular method of writing and no two men are gifted with the same method, just as not two people are alike.
Writing - Unities Of Time, Place, And Action
The purpose of the short story, however, is to reproduce a single and critical phase in the life of a solitary character. This crisis may be treated in detail, or otherwise, according to how many words the story is to contain.
Writing - Unity Of Impression
Unity of impression presupposes unity of conception, deep sympathy with the story and its characters, and the maintenance of a general tone throughout.
Writing - The Title Of Your Story
As an exercise in choosing interesting and appropriate titles, the reader should reflect on the aptness of the title after he has read a story. Let him study the theme, then ask himself what he would have named the story.
Writing - Stories Of Mystery
The master of the horror story is Poe. By a close scrutiny of his mystery stories, the student will learn much of the method employed in effectively devising and building up the materials of the horror story.
Writing - Important Advice
Before dealing with the revision of the story, I will take up first its actual writing. First of all, the efficient and systematic, the sure and careful, author will make out an outline of his plot.
Writing - The Photplay Defined And Explained
As previously stated, many stories are not suitable for photoplays. This is because they consist so largely of the abstract, of description, of word-pictures. They lack action, and action is the stuff photoplays are made of.
Writing - Dictionary Of Words Used In Photoplay Writing
Before proceeding with a study of the component parts of a photoplay, it is desirable that the beginner get a complete understanding of the meaning of the technical terms used in photoplay writing and in the studio.
Writing - The Component Parts Of A Photoplay
In all fiction, plot is one of the most important elements. Plot is the story itself. Without plot there is no story. But, in the photoplay, plot has even greater weight than in the story.
Writing - The Photoplay Plot
Before the actual writing of the four principal parts of the photoplay is taken up, it is desirable to get a thorough knowledge of just what constitutes a photo-play plot. This is desirable for the reason that the actual writing of a photoplay cannot begin until a plot is first worked out.
Writing - The Synopsis
You need three things to sell a script easily: a good plot, a well-written synopsis, a satisfactory title. Plot, synopsis, title—the eternal three of successful photoplay writing. Their importance cannot be overestimated.
Writing - The Cast Of Characters
When writing the synopsis, first note down the names of all your principal characters before you begin to outline the plot. Then, as you complete your synopsis, record each additional character's name as soon as he or she appears.
Writing - The Scene Plot
In short, when developing your plot, try to confine the action of your characters to a limited area, so as not to be extravagant in scenes and settings.
Wild or Hog Peanut
Hogs, rooting about in the moist soil where it grows, unearth the hairy pods that should produce next year's vines. Hence the poor excuse for branding a charming plant with a repellent folk-name.
Violets
Lacking perfume only to be a perfectly satisfying flower, the Common, Purple, Meadow, or Hooded Blue Violet has nevertheless established itself in the hearts of the people from the Arctic to the Gulf as no sweet-scented, showy, hothouse exotic has ever done.
Sea Lavender
Seen in masses, from a little distance, this tiny flower looks like blue-gray mist blown in over the meadows from sea, and on closer view each plant suggests sea-spray itself.
Fringed Gentian
An elusive plant is this gentian, which by no means always reappears in the same places year after year, for it is an annual whose seeds alone perpetuate it.
Wild Blue Phlox
While the wild blue phlox is sometimes cultivated, it is the Garden Phlox, common in woods and thickets from Pennsylvania to Illinois and southward, that under a gardener's care bears the large terminal clusters of purple, magenta, crimson, pink, and white flowers abundant in old-fashioned, hardy borders.
Virginia Cowslip or Blue-bells
Not to be outdone by its cousins the heliotrope and the forget-me-not, this lovely and far more showy spring flower has found its way into the rockwork and sheltered, moist nooks of many gardens, especially in England.
Forget-me-not
How rare a color blue must have been originally among our flora is evident from the majority of blue and purple flowers that, although now abundant here and so perfectly at home, are really quite recent immigrants from Europe and Asia.
Viper's Bugloss, Blue-weed, or Blue-thistle
Years ago, when simple folk believed God had marked plants with some sign to indicate the special use for which each was intended, they regarded the spotted stem of the bugloss, and its seeds shaped like a serpent's head, as certain indications that the herb would cure snake bites.
Blue Vervain, Wild Hyssop, or Simpler's Joy
Seeds below, a circle of insignificant purple-blue flowers in the centre, and buds at the top of the vervain's slender spires do not produce a striking effect, yet this common plant certainly does not lack beauty.
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