Antiques Digest Browse Auctions Appraisal Antiques And Arts News Home

Syracuse, Museum of Fine Arts
Syracuse, may well be proud of its fine collection of representative paintings of American art, now a permanent possession of the museum. Simplicity, the prevailing note in the landscapes of Charles H. Davis (1856) in the museum, could well be taken as the keynote of the whole collection.
Rochester, Memorial Art Gallery
Rochester is fortunate in possessing one of George Inness, Jr.'s finest paintings of cattle, Bringing Home the Cows. In this picture we feel his inherent love of evening when moist clouds hang low and a soft radiance fills the air.
Buffalo, N.Y., Albright Art Gallery
The collectors of the Albright Art Gallery, with the seer's insight, have selected for their American art section splendid canvases of these leaders. That George Inness leads the van is not surprising.
Toledo, Museum of Art
The Toledo Museum of Art has a collection of nearly sixty paintings by American artists. A collection, too, that embraces some of the representative pictures in American art.
Detroit Museum of Art
The Detroit Museum of Art, with its representative collection of works of the masters from various countries of Europe, may well be the pride of the city of Detroit. These paintings were gathered while the old master craze in America was in its infancy.
Muskegon, Michigan, The Gallery of Fine Arts in the Hackley Public Library
Of the smaller art museums in America perhaps none is more worthy of special mention than the Hackley Gallery at Muskegon. Its fifty-four oil paintings in the permanent collection from English, French, Dutch, Spanish, and American art are a key-stone for further additions that no future critics or unpublished information can displace.
Chicago, The Art Institute - Dutch, Flemish and Spanish
The Art Institute of Chicago at the present writing is the most popular gallery in America, if the number of yearly visitors is the test of popularity.
Chicago, The Art Institute - American and French
One of the finest, if not the finest collection of paintings by George Inness in America is in the Art Institute of Chicago.
Milwaukee, Layton Art Gallery
When Mr. Frederick Layton and his wife gave the now famous Layton Gallery to the City of Milwaukee in 1888, they bestowed a gift that in intellectual value is compounding interest to each succeeding generation.
Minneapolis, Institute of Art
The Minneapolis Institute of Art has perhaps one of the newest galleries in our country and one laid on an extensive scale. The building, which had its inaugural exhibition in January and February, 1915, is but the first unit or about one-seventh of the entire plan.
Indianapolis, John Herron Art Institute
Indiana is particularly fortunate in having a portrait of her most distinguished literary son in her capital, and painted by America's most famous portrait painter, John Singer Sargent.
Cincinnati, Museum
The latest acquisition to the Cincinnati Museum, and perhaps the most important painting of all its possessions, is the Portrait of Philip the Second, by Titian.
New Orleans, Delgado Museum of Art
In the smaller galleries we find that most of the originals are by less known artists of today, but the character of the works selected is of a high order. This is specially true of the permanent collection in the Isaac Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans.
Fort Worth, Texas, Carnegie Public Library
The state of Texas is to be congratulated that the Carnegie Library at Fort Worth has one of Gilbert Stuart's splendid portraits, with a perfectly authenticated history.
St. Louis, City Art Museum
The City Art Museum of St. Louis has an interesting and varied collection of paintings. There are pictures by many of the nineteenth century artists from most of the countries of Europe, and a goodly number representing American painters.
California-Sacramento, E.B. Crocker Art Gallery
Thirty years ago the city of Sacramento received from Mrs. Margaret E. Crocker a gift of inestimable value, in the E. B. Crocker Gallery. The building was erected ten years before by Mr. and Mrs. Crocker to contain the rare treasures they were collecting in their travels through Europe.
California - San Francisco Institute of Art - Emanuel Walter Collection
As we study the Emanuel Walter Collection we are impressed with the comprehensive selection of paintings representing the Barbizon artists.
To The Spanish Main
The Cuban coast is a long succession of beautiful blue mountains, finely drawn as the pencillings of an old Italian master, and as delicate in outline as the purple djebels of northern Africa.
Panama
No matter what else you miss in Panama, do not neglect a walk upon the Bovedas, or city walls that skirt the gulf. These great fortifications that the Spanish erected in their American possessions, are forty feet in height and no less than sixty feet in thickness.
Down The West Coast To Peru
It is only a three hour run from Eten to Pacasmayo. On the way you catch glimpses of higher mountains, buttresses of the Coast Cordillera, and by the shore see little groups of fishing-huts clustered in the coves.
Lima, City Of The Kings
With a bit of energy, with the impetus of a few enthusiastic citizens, Lima could be made most attractive as a winter resort. When the Canal is opened, I dare say it will become one, especially when some hotel not yet in existence, but soon to be, I hear, shall have been constructed, set in wide gardens.
The Oroya Railway
Then there is the Oroya Railway. Where else can you, in the short space of a few hours, ascend from the coast, from palms and mango groves, bananas and tropical gardens, to the snow and ice of eternal winter, to heights above the utmost summit of Mont Blanc?
Xauxa And Huancayo
The ride to the lake gave us a pretty glimpse of this valley of Xauxa with its sheep grazing in the meadows, its long files of eucalypti and clusters of tincurals, and its flights of beautiful birds.
Southern Peru
The Limari of the Chilian Line took us in a night from Callao harbour to the anchorage off Cerro Azul. Before us lay a typical Peruvian port, barren and dry.
To Arequipa
In the afternoon we sighted the Chincha Islands, white, flat-topped, like half-melted icebergs, celebrated for their guano deposits, a semicircle of them off Pisco fringing the horizon.
La Villa Hermosa
Arequipa is the second city in size in Peru, and its founder, Garcia Manuel de Carvajal, called it La Villa Hermosa, the Beautiful City, and it well deserved its name.
The Land Of The Incas
Beyond San Pablo we could make out the ruins of the great temple of Viracocha, off to the right, half-hidden in a rocky country. Each station, as we passed, was full of people, the train being still a novelty, an object of interest.
Cuzco, The Inca Capital
The Incas were not artists. Their buildings displayed neither imagination nor beauty of detail, but were characterised rather by stern simplicity and extreme solidity of construction.
Lake Titicaca
We entered the Straits of Tiquino, whose stony hillsides, terraced with vineyards, reminded us of the Rhine country. Little groups of thatched mud huts and pottery-roofed houses, humble homes of these primitive lacustrian peoples, lay scattered in the fields or huddled about a pointed belfry.
A Glimpse Of Bolivia
The principal hotel, installed in an extensive old palace surrounding two fine stone courts, overlooks one corner of the Plaza Mayor that forms the heart of the city, the centre of its activities.
[Page: 251  |  252  |  253  |  254  |  255  |  256  |  257  |  258  |  259  |  260  | 
261  |  262  |  263  |  264  |  265  |  266  |  267  |  268  |  269  |  270  | 
271  |  272  |  273  |  274  |  275  |  276  |  277  |  278  |  279  |  280  | 
281  |  282  |  283  |  284  |  285  |  286  |  287  |  288  |  289  |  290  | 
291  |  292  |  293  |  294  |  295  |  296  |  297  |  298  |  299  |  300  |  More Pages ]

Pages:   [1-50]   [51-100]   [101-150]   [151-200]   [201-250]   [251-300]   [301-350]  
[351-400]   [401-450]   [451-500]   [501-550]   [551-600]   [601-650]   [651-700]   [701-750]   [751-800]  


Please contact us at info@oldandsold.com