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Carcassonne
When I say the town, I mean the towns; there being two at Carcassonne, perfectly distinct, and each with excellent claims to the title.
Biarritz
If Bayonne is the center of commercial affairs for the Basque country, its citizens must, at any rate, go to Biarritz if they want to live the elegant and worldly life.
Down The Saone To Lyons
The Saone is about the size of the Mohawk, but not half so beautiful; at least for the greater part of its course. Indeed, you can hardly compare American with European rivers.
Lyons
I take this opportunity to tell you that we are at the ancient and celebrated Lugdunum, a city situated upon the confluence of the Rhone and Saone (Arar, I should say) two people.
Marseilles
So we went on, until eleven at night, when we halted at the town of Aix (within two stages of Marseilles) to sleep.
The Little Republic Of Andorra
The little republic of Andorra, hidden away in the fastnesses of the Pyrenees between France and Spain, its allegiance divided between the bishop of Urgel in Spain and the French government.
Gavarnie
It is enjoined upon every living creature able to mount a horse, a mule, or any quadruped whatever, to visit Gavarnie; in default of other beasts, he should, putting aside all shame, bestride an ass.
Bruges
Bruges, in particular, was one of the chief stations of the Hanseatic League, which formed an essentially commercial alliance for the mutual protection of the northern trading centers.
A Pen Picture Of Bruges
It is the quaintest and prettiest of all the quaint and pretty towns I have seen. A painter might spend months here, and wander from church to church, and admire old towers and pinnacles.
Ghent
Flanders owes everything to its water communications. At the junction of the Schelde with the Lys and Lei, there grew up in the very early Middle Ages a trading town, named Gent in Flemish, and Gand in French, but commonly Anglicized as Ghent.
Brussels
It was undoubtedly under the rule of Charles V. that Brussels reached its zenith of ancient prosperity.
Waterloo
The battle of Waterloo is an enigma as obscure for those who gained it as for him who lost it. To Napoleon it is a panic; Blucher sees nothing in it but fire; Wellington does not understand it at all.
Waterloo: A Visit To The Field
The French wished to call it the battle of Mont St. Jean, but Wellington said The Battle of Waterloo. The victor's wish prevailed.
Antwerp
Antwerp—the city on the wharf—became famous at the beginning of the sixteenth century under the reign of the enterprising Charles V. Antwerp was then truly a leading city in almost all things.
How The Dutch Obtained Their Land
The vicissitudes which accompany the agony and death of this great river in Holland, are such as really to excite a sense of pity, such as is felt for the misfortunes and inglorious end of a people once powerful and happy.
Rotterdam And The Hague
Amsterdam is a semicircle, the Hague square, Rotterdam an equilateral triangle.
Haarlem
It crosses an isthmus between the sea and a lake which covered the whole country between Leyden, Haarlem, and Amsterdam till 1839, when it became troublesome, and the States-General forthwith, after the fashion of Holland, voted its destruction.
Scheveningen
Of course the largest of the watering-places in the Netherlands is Scheveningen, and it has a splendid bathing beach which makes it an attractive resort for fashionable Germans and Hollanders.
Delft
An excursion must be made to Delft, only twenty minutes distant from The Hague by rail. Pepys calls it a most sweet town, with bridges and a river in every street, and that is a tolerably accurate description.
Leyden
Leyden, the antique Athens of the north, the Saragossa of the Low Countries, the oldest and most illustrious of the daughters of Holland, is one of those cities which make you thoughtful upon first entering them, and are remembered for a long time afterward with a certain impression of sadness.
Dortrecht
Our morning at Dortrecht was very delightful, and it is a thoroughly charming place.
The Zuyder Zee
North Holland touched Friesland, and where the gulf now extends there was a vast region sprinkled with fresh-water lakes, the largest of which, the Flevo, mentioned by Tacitus, was separated from the sea by a fertile and populous isthmus.
The Art Of Holland
The Dutch school of painting has one quality which renders it particularly attractive to us Italians; it is of all others the most different from our own, the very antithesis, or the opposite pole of art.
The Tulips Of Holland
The word tulip recalls one of the strangest popular follies that has ever been seen in the world, which showed itself in Holland toward the middle of the seventeenth century.
The Rhine Valley
Of all rivers, I prefer the Rhine. It is now a year, when passing the bridge of boats at Kehl, since I first saw it. I remember that I felt a certain respect, a sort of adoration, for this old, this classic stream.
From Bonn To Mayence
After passing Andernach we saw in the distance the highlands of the middle Rhine—which rise above Coblentz, guarding the entrance to its scenery—and the mountains of the Moselle.
Cologne
The sun had set when we reached Cologne. I gave my luggage to a porter, with orders to carry it to a hotel at Duez, a little town on the opposite side of the Rhine; and directed my steps toward the cathedral.
Round About Coblenz
Coblenz is the place which many years ago gave me my first associations with the Rhine. From a neighboring town we often drove to Coblenz.
Bingen And Mayence
Bingen is an exceedingly pretty place, having at once the somber look of an ancient town, and the cheering aspect of a new one.
Frankfort-Am-Main
Frankfort is a genuine old German city. Founded by Charlemagne, afterward a rallying-point of the Crusaders, and for a long time the capital of the German Empire.
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